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Physics Nobel honors graphene discovery

Various sources
5 October 2010

Two Russian-born scientists shared the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday for groundbreaking experiments with the strongest and thinnest material known to mankind - a potential building block for faster computers and lighter airplanes and satellites.

University of Manchester professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov used Scotch tape to isolate graphene, a form of carbon only one atom thick but more than 100 times stronger than steel, and showed it has exceptional properties, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said.

"I personally did not expect to get this prize," Said Geim. "I slept soundly last night because I never expected to win it."

Geim also said that he doesn't expect the honor to change much about the way he works. "Having won the Nobel Prize, some people sit back and stop doing anything, whereas others work so hard that they go mad in a few years. But I will be going into the office as usual and continuing to work hard and paddle through life as usual."

Full story from the Associated Press/Yahoo
Graphene physics research yields Nobel Prize (CNet)
Carbon breakthrough wins Nobel physics prize (Financial Times)
Press release from University of Manchester