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SPIE Photonics West 2018 | Call for Papers

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Micro/Nano Lithography

Innovation: The corporate lab as ringmaster

New York Times
17 August 2009

The corporate lab's role is evolving to be more of a coordinator and integrator of innovation, from both outside and inside the company walls.

Hewlett-Packard is one company that has moved aggressively into fostering innovation, with an annual series of grant awards for research averaging $75,000 per institution. See the HP Labs Innovation Research Awards announced in June 2009.

Among this year's HP grant winners are SPIE Members John Bowers (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara), Thomas Huang (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champign), and Alan Willner (Univ. of Southern California). Willner is on the program committee for upcoming conferences on Free Space Laser Communications and Photonics of Quantum Computing at SPIE Photonics West 2010 (PW10), and has served as chair and committee member for serval other SPIE conferences.

Brian Wandell (Stanford Univ.), author of nearly 30 SPIE papers, is among several HP grant winners who are authoring papers for IS&T-SPIE Electronic Imaging 2010 in February. Others include Huang, Elke Rundensteiner (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Daniel Keim (Konstanz Univ.), and Ming Ronnier Luo (Univ. of Leeds).

HP research fellow Raymond Beausoleil, also cited in the NYT article, is an author of several PW10 papers and on the committee for the conference on Slow and Fast Light. Luo has authored approximately 25 journal or proceedings papers for SPIE, Huang more than 40, and Bowers more than 50.

Full story from New York Times