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Electronic Imaging & Signal Processing

Low-cost GigE camera

Prosilica has released the GC780, a new low cost camera with a GigE VisionTM compliant interface. The ultra-compact GC780 (33x46x38mm) features the 1/2" Sony ICX415 progressive scan CCD sensor and runs 64 frames per second at full resolution (782x582). The ICX415 features low dark current, high sensitivity, continuous variable-speed shutter, low smear and excellent anti-blooming characteristics. The GC780 has a C-mount with adjustable back-focus and is available in monochrome and color models. The camera is well suited for applications such as high-speed inspection, machine vision, optical character recognition, traffic imaging, robotics, and OEM applications.

The GC780 incorporates an advanced set of rich camera features including snapshot/global shutter, pixel binning, area of interest readout, video-type auto-iris support, external trigger and sync I/O, RS-232 peripheral port, exposure, gain and offset controls, non-volatile configuration memory, event recorder capability, pre-trigger recording, programmable strobe functions, multicasting, configurable IP addresses, autoexposure and autowhite balance controls.

Thanks to its Gigabit Ethernet interface, the GC780 is plug-and-play and does not require a frame-grabber to operate. The GigE interface also allows cable lengths of up to 100m (300ft) long using conventional Ethernet cabling (Cat5e) and even longer lengths using fiber optic cables.