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Optoelectronics & Communications

One step closer to invisibility cloak

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have successfully developed metamaterials that can bend infrared light away from objects; these metamaterials could one day be used to create an "invisibility cloak."

As described in the Nature and Science articles published by the group, the Berkeley researchers created a fishnet structure with 21 layers, alternating between a metal and magnesium fluoride, resulting in a metamaterial with a negative index of refraction for infrared light. The researchers said by making the fishnet structure even smaller, they should be able to do the same with visible light.

More in the article from New York Times.