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Optical Engineering Special Sections


To submit a manuscript for consideration in a Special Section, please prepare the manuscript according to the journal guidelines and use the Online Submission SystemLeaving site. A cover letter indicating that the submission is intended for this special section should be included with the paper. Papers will be peer‐reviewed in accordance with the journal's established policies and procedures. Authors who pay the voluntary page charges will receive the benefit of open access.

View the list of special sections that have already been published on the SPIE Digital Library.

Calls for Papers:

Single-Photon Detection, Generation, and Applications

Optical Fabrication, Testing, and Metrology

Machine Vision: Processing, Components, and Systems

Slow and Fast Light

High-Speed 3-D Optical Metrology and Applications

Practical Holography: New Procedures, Materials, and Applications

Advances in Precision Optical Measurements and Instrumentation for Geometrical and Mechanical Quantities

Optical Frequency Combs

Laser Damage II

Fiber Lasers and Applications

Computational Approaches to Imaging LADAR

Electro-optical/Infrared System Measurement for Modeling Performance

Panoramic Imaging

Digital Photoelasticity: Advancements and Applications


August 2014

Single-Photon Detection, Generation, and Applications

Guest Editors:

Alex McIntosh
MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Electro-Optical Materials and Devices Group
Tel: 781-981-4736
Fax: 781-981-0122
E-mail: alex@ll.mit.edu

Mark Itzler
Princeton Lightwave Inc.
2555 US. Highway 130 Ste. 1
Cranbury, New Jersey 08512-3509
Tel: 609-495-2551
Fax: 609-395-9113
E-mail: mitzler@princetonlightwave.com

Call for papers: The past two decades have produced significant advancement in the state of the art for many single-photon generation and detection technologies. The use of single-photon technologies is being pursued over an enormous portion of the spectrum ranging from ultraviolet to millimeter wavelengths, and the breadth of applications that rely on these technologies-including fluorescence techniques, quantum information processing, and photon-starved imaging and communications-continues to grow rapidly. This special section of Optical Engineering will present a critical overview of the current state of the art, as well as detailed analysis of promising new single-photon component technologies and applications.
Original papers are solicited in the following areas:

  • Single-photon detectors (SPD), such as photomultiplier tubes, avalanche photodiodes, superconducting detectors, and other novel SPD technologies
  • Enabling detection, quench, processing, and read-out electronics
  • Single-photon sources
  • Single-photon manipulation
  • Applications of single photons and photon counting
  • Metrology of single-photon component technologies.

Authors interested in contributing tutorial or review papers should contact one of the Guest Editors with suggestions for desired subject matter and content.

Closed for submissions.

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September 2014

Optical Fabrication, Testing, and Metrology

Guest Editors:

Daniel Malacara-Hernández
Centro de Investigaciones en Óptica, A.C.
Loma del Bosque #115 Col. Lomas del Campestre
León, Guanajuato 37150
E-mail: dmalacara@cio.mx

Joanna Schmit
Bruker Nano Surfaces Division
3400 E. Britannia Drive #150
Tucson, Arizona 85706
E-mail: Joanna.Schmit@bruker-nano.com

Sven Schröder
Fraunhofer Institute
Applied Optics and Precision Engineering
Surface and Thin Film Characterization Group
Albert-Einstein-Str. 7
07745 Jena
Germany
E-mail: sven.schroeder@iof.fraunhofer.de

Call for Papers: Optical fabrication, testing, and metrology involve the optical engineering and science related to the design, manufacturing, and characterization of optical components and systems. These fields have had important developments in the last few years, opening new possibilities in many aspects.

Increasingly, challenging requirements on optical components have led to the development of highly sophisticated optical fabrication techniques such as magnetorheological finishing, polishing using deformable tools, computer-controlled polishing, among others. This allows optical components to be manufactured with arbitrary shape (freeform optics) and highest surface quality (figure, mid- and high-spatial frequency roughness). These developments have also led to stringent demands on optical testing and metrology. The latest highly stable and precise interferometers employ new mathematical techniques to asses surface shape. In addition, advanced methods are now widely used to characterize surface roughness, including scanning probes and light-scattering techniques.

This special section of Optical Engineering is designed to provide a view into the current state-of-the-art techniques in optical fabrication and evaluation of optical elements and instruments.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Magnetorheological finishing
  • Ion beam figuring
  • Freeform optics and aspheres fabrication and testing.
  • Astronomical telescopes fabrication
  • Testing optical elements and instruments
  • New or improved optical testing techniques or instruments
  • Surface characterization techniques
  • Light-scattering techniques
  • Interferogram evaluation techniques
  • Specification of surface properties (shape, roughness, defects)

Closed for submissions.

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October 2014

Machine Vision: Processing, Components, and Systems

Guest Editors:

Richard Kleihorst
Xetal NV
Boeimeerstraat 1A
2820 Bonheiden, Belgium
  and
Ghent University
Image Processing and Interpretation Research Group
Department TELIN
Sint Pietersnieuwstraat 41
9000 Gent, Belgium
E-mail: richard@xetal.eu

Hideo Saito
Keio University
Department of Information and Computer Science
3-14-1 Hiyoshi Kohoku-ku
Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
E-mail: saito@hvrl.ics.keio.ac.jp

Call for Papers: Computer vision is a highly regarded engineering science used to obtain information or measurements from images or video. With the advent of high-performance computing possibilities that are now appearing in the consumer markets, we find systems where both capturing and processing are present. These systems have to work in real-time and are encountered in industrial setups, human-machine interfaces, and camera networks. Instead of creating images, data is produced that is used to make decisions. When such a system is self-contained it is called a smart camera. The challenge of innovation in vision systems and smart cameras is in particular the demand for multiple skills. A vision system needs hardware, (embedded) software, optics, communication means, communication protocols, (efficient) power supply, and last but not least, it has to run algorithms to reliably perform an application. In an aim to bring together the various requirements for these vision systems - the processing and the components - we solicit papers for a special section of Optical Engineering.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Image capturing
    • HDR sensors
    • Multi-spectral sensors
    • Depth sensors (stereo, time of flight, etc.)
    • Light field sensors
  • Image-processing hardware
    • HW/SW codesign in vision architectures
    • Ultra-low-power processing
    • High-performance embedded computing for vision
  • Firmware and software
    • Vision system control software
    • Embedded image processing
    • Vision sensor network middleware
  • System aspects
    • Cyber kinetic designs
    • Vision-equipped robotics
    • Communication aspects
    • Vision-based human-computer interaction
  • Algorithms for vision systems
    • Feature extraction and matching
    • Surface reconstruction and analysis
    • Motion image sequence analysis
    • Pattern recognition and object recognition
  • Applications
    • Factory automation and robotics
    • Intelligent transport systems
    • Security and surveillance systems
    • Broadcasting and multimedia systems
    • Medical systems
    • Remote sensing
  • Papers describing projects on vision systems.

Closed for submissions.

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October 2014

Slow and Fast Light

Guest Editor:

Selim Shahriar
Northwestern University
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Room M248
2145 N. Sheridan Road
Evanston, Illinois 60208-3118
E-mail: shahriar@northwestern.edu

Jacob (Koby) Scheuer
Tel-Aviv University
School of Electrical Engineering
Department of Physical Electronics
Ramat-Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel
Email: kobys@eng.tau.ac.il

Call for papers: Steep dispersions in engineered media of a wide variety have opened up a new direction of research in optics. A positive dispersion with negligible absorption can be used to slow the propagation of optical pulses to extremely small velocities. Similarly, a negative dispersion with small absorption or residual gain can be employed to create conditions under which pulses can propagate superluminally. These effects have now moved beyond the stage of intellectual curiosity, and have ushered in studies of a set of exciting applications, ranging from optical data buffering to enhanced precision in interferometry.

Many different systems are currently being investigated in order to achieve optimal performances for these applications. For producing slow light via positive dispersion, the systems being studied include conventional electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a lambda system, population pulsations in a two-level system, Raman and Brillouin gains, wave mixing in photorefractive media, photonic bandgap structures, coupled microresonators, and so on. For producing fast light via negative dispersion, the systems being studied include dual-peaked Raman gain, dual-pumped Brillouin gain in a fiber, fiber-coupled whispering gallery resonators, and photorefractive media, among others. Some important technological developments for advancing these systems include the developments of rubidium loaded hollow core fiber and anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW), tapered fiber embedded in hot and cold rubidium vapor, dynamically adjustable photonic crystal structures, etc.

One of the key applications driving the field of slow light is optical data buffering. The key goal in this area is to develop a practical and compact system capable of producing a significant and controllable delay for high bandwidth optical data. An initial challenge in this endeavor was the perceived constraint imposed by a limited delay-bandwidth product. However, various clever ideas have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to pave the way for overcoming this constraint. Another arena of interest is the use of slow light for enhancing the sensitivity of interferometry. For example, the slow light process can be employed to enhance the precision of relative rotation sensing and spectrally resolved interferometry. Other applications of slow light include quantum memory, phased array antenna, and precise timing of data pulses.

Similarly, it has been shown that a fast light medium can be used to realize an absolute rotation sensor with a sensitivity that is orders of magnitude better than that of a conventional gyroscope. A fast light-enhanced gyroscope may be sensitive enough to detect the gravitational frame-dragging effect terrestrially, via measuring the Lense-Thirring rotation. Furthermore, the fast light process has been used to demonstrate the so-called white light cavity (WLC). A WLC can be used to produce a long delay for a data stream of a high bandwidth without being constrained by the delay-bandwidth product limitation encountered in a conventional cavity. Furthermore, a WLC can be employed to enhance the sensitivity-bandwidth product of the next-generation interferometer being developed for detecting gravitational waves. Recently, it has been shown that fast light can also be used for realizing ideal trap doors for data buffering with a very large delay-bandwidth product, with minimal distortion.

Traditionally, slow and fast light effects have been investigated in passive systems. However, it is also important to investigate the effects of steep dispersion-both normal and anomalous-in a laser. One example is the superluminal laser, which can be realized by using a gain medium with a dip in the gain profile. In particular, it has been shown that such a laser may be the ideal system for fast-light enhanced sensitivity in measuring a broad range of effects, including rotation, acceleration, magnetic fields, temperature, and so on. It may also be possible to realize a gravitational wave detector using such a laser. It is also possible to realize a subluminal laser, with a steep peak in the gain spectrum. Such a laser is also likely to have important properties, such as extreme insensitivity to perturbations. In order to optimize the utilization of the superluminal and subluminal laser, it is also important to study, theoretically and experimentally, the quantum effect limited noise properties thereof.

The objective of this special section is to put together concepts and recent results covering the entire spectrum of technological advances and applications in the field of slow and fast light.

List of Topics:

  • Materials and systems for slow light 
  • Optical data buffering using slow light 
  • Optical architecture for slow-light-mediated data buffering 
  • Application of slow and fast light for interferometry 
  • Theoretical and experimental advances in overcoming the delay-bandwidth product limitation 
  • Materials and systems for fast light 
  • Trap-door optical data buffering with fast light 
  • Fast-light-enhanced sensing of rotation, acceleration, magnetic field, temperature, and other effects
  • Development and characterization of superluminal and subluminal lasers 
  • Quantum noise and linewidth of superluminal and subluminal lasers
  • Gravitational wave detection using slow or fast light.

Submissions due 30 March 2014.

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November 2014

High-Speed 3-D Optical Metrology and Applications

Guest Editors:

Song Zhang
Iowa State University
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Ames, Iowa 50011
E-mail: song@iastate.edu

Rongguang Liang
College of Optical Sciences
University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona 85721
E-mail: rliang@optics.arizona.edu

Lianxiang Yang
Oakland University
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Rochester, Michigan 48309
E-mail: yang2@oakland.edu

Call for papers: Recent innovations in computational and electronic technologies have drastically enhanced the 3-D optical metrology field in terms of measuring speed and accuracy, as well as expanded applications. High‐speed 3-D optical metrology is a platform technology that could benefit numerous scientific studies and engineering practices. Lately, a number of novel high‐speed 3-D optical metrology methods have been developed, and these technologies have been applied to the fields ranging from medicine, computer science, robotics, biometrics, homeland security, agriculture and biology, and to automotive, manufacturing, and entertainment industries. For example, Microsoft Kinect® has penetrated 3-D optical metrology into our daily lives; real‐time 3-D metrology techniques have permitted in‐situ inspection in the electronics industry; and high‐speed 3-D sensing devices have enabled better robotic navigation.

The goal of this special section is to assemble the most recent technologies developed on high‐speed (e.g., 30 Hz or better) 3-D optical metrology, and to seek novel application areas where high‐speed 3-D optical metrology technologies have conquered some new challenges that were previously unsolved, or have significantly enhanced those areas. Original or review articles are solicited on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Novel methods for high‐speed 3-D optical metrology
  • Novel computational methods (e.g. GPU) that facilitates high‐speed optical metrology
  • Novel methods for 3-D data processing (e.g., compression, registration, and comparison)
  • Novel instrumentation or devices that potentially impact human lives at large
  • Applications in biomedical research and practices (e.g., minimal invasive surgery)
  • Applications in fluids, mechanics, and engineering science in general
  • Applications in robotics (e.g., navigation)
  • Applications in the automotive industry
  • Applications in the manufacturing industry
  • Applications in the entertainment industry
  • Applications in biometrics and homeland security

Closed for submissions.

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November 2014

Practical Holography: New Procedures, Materials, and Applications

Guest Editors:

A. R. Ganesan
Indian Institute of Technology Madras
Department of Physics
Chennai 600036, India
E-mail: arg@iitm.ac.in

Pietro Ferraro
CNR - Instituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO)
Via Campi Flegrei, 34 80078 Pozzuoli, Italy
E-mail: pietro.ferraro@ino.it

Call for papers: Ever since its conception by Dennis Gabor, holography has taken multiple dimensions in terms of new techniques and applications in display, 3-D measurement of displacement/deformations, engineering metrology, security labels, biology, medicine, nondestructive testing (NDT), engineering design and quality control of products in automotives, aerospace, and manufacturing. Developments in electronic technology for sensing and computation have contributed to the leaping growth of holography by way of speed, convenience, and applicability. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) or TV holography offers real-time capabilities for several holographic metrological applications.

The aim of this special section is to bring together the recent techniques and technologies developed on holography, as well as novel applications. Original articles are solicited on practical holography that could include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • New holographic methods
  • Novel methods in holographic metrology
  • Holographic displays
  • Applications in the entertainment industry
  • Holographic security
  • Holography in biology and biomedical applications
  • Industrial applications of holography
  • Applications in various engineering areas
  • ESPI and shearography
  • Holographic NDT
  • Digital holography
  • Homeland security
  • Diagnosis for conservation and valorization of cultural heritages
  • Interferometric microscopy in biology 
  • Holographic imaging in microfluidics and for lab-on-chip devices
  • Wavefront and optical components testing
  • Holography at ultraviolet, infrared, and terahertz wavelengths
  • New recording materials for holography and data storage
  • Fringe analysis.

Closed for submissions.

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December 2014

Advances in Precision Optical Measurements and Instrumentation for Geometrical and Mechanical Quantities

Guest Editors:

Lian Dong Yu
Hefei University of Technology
School of Instrument Science and Optoelectronic Engineering
Hefei, Anhui, 230009, China
E-mail: liandongyu@hfut.edu.cn

Ben Yong Chen
Zhejiang Sci-Tech University
School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation
2 Avenue Development District, Hangzhou, China
E-mail:chenby@zstu.edu.cn

Lianxiang Yang
Oakland University
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Rochester, Michigan 48309
E-mail: yang2@oakland.edu

Call for Papers: Precision optical measurements and instrumentation have gained great prominence in the last decade in the areas of high-precision production and manufacturing, and thus the development of new and improved high-precision processes and machines. This special section will serve as a forum to share the latest advances of optical-based precision measurements and instrumentation for geometrical and mechanical quantities, such as length, angle, form, surface roughness, displacement/strain, speed and other related quantities, as well as their novel applications in industry including automotive, aeronautic/astronautic, biomedical, high tech, and other related fields. Recent developments and next-generation methods for optical measurement of these quantities are both of interest. Suggested topics for the special section include:

  • Modern optics and instruments for precision measurements 
  • Micro/nanomeasurements and micro/nanodevices 
  • Optoelectronic systems and optical instrument design 
  • Optical measurements and image processing 
  • Online and in-press measurements 
  • Intelligent measurements and instrumentation 
  • Uncertainty, traceability and calibration, and signal-processing algorithms.

Closed for submissions.

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December 2014

Optical Frequency Combs

Guest Editors:

Vladimir Ilchenko
OEwaves Inc.
465 N. Halstead Street, Suite 140
Pasadena, California 91107-6013
E-mail: Vladimir.Ilchenko@oewaves.com

Zhaohui Li
Jinan University
Institute of Photonics Technology
Huangpu Road W 601
Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632, China
E-mail: tlzh88@jnu.edu.cn

Call for Papers: Optical frequency combs have revolutionized optical frequency metrology. Deployment of microstructured fibers, exhibiting single-mode operation over an extended wavelength range together with unique dispersion properties, has allowed compression of the pulses from mode-locked titanium sapphire lasers and the production of octave-spanning frequency combs. Subsequently phase locking the optical frequency to the pulse repetition rate using small tabletop laboratory devices has allowed easy transfer of metrological frequency precision and stability between different optical frequencies and between optical and radio frequency domains. In the past decade, many measurement methods and devices have been developed based on generation of optical frequency combs and coherent nonlinear interactions, assisting in development of optical frequency standards, high-resolution spectroscopy, elaborate time domain, and spectroscopic measurements. Methodology of optical frequency combs has been contributed by different types of optical cavities, mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber cavities, and fiber loops, and with electro-optical modulators. The result has been a new toolkit for optical frequency metrology, microwave photonics for radio frequency (RF) signal generation, and processing by optical methods. In the last several years, optical frequency combs have been obtained and new measurement techniques and devices demonstrated based on optical microcavities with whispering-gallery modes. These advances open the prospects for "pocket metrology," including ultracompact optical clocks for GPS-denied applications, miniature low-noise microwave signal sources, and advanced sensing. Early demonstrations of the long-awaited use of optical frequency combs in ultrabroadband data transmission have appeared. Overall, the status of the optical combs field can perhaps be represented as a transition from research to development, from verification of principles to creation of practical devices, and introduction of technology into commercial systems and architectures. Yet many unanswered questions remain concerning the exact physics of optical frequency comb formation in fibers and cavities, providing a challenging field for theoretical analyses.

The goal of this special section is to represent the current status of the field of optical frequency combs, novel methods, and devices, including those based on optical microcavities, as well as applications including frequency metrology, advanced measurement techniques using optical frequency combs, novel RF photonics devices and architectures, and others.
Possible topics of the special section include, but are not limited to:

  • Optical supercontinuum generation in microstructured fibers 
  • Mode-locked fiber lasers and optical frequency combs
  • Octave-spanning combs 
  • Frequency combs with Fabry-Perot and fiber cavities
  • Frequency combs in optical microcavities 
  • Brillouin and Raman combs in optical microcavities 
  • Precision dispersion measurements
  • Comb-based high spectral purity RF oscillators and other RF photonics devices
  • Time-domain measurements with frequency combs
  • Advanced signal transmission and processing using frequency combs.


Manuscripts due 1 May 2014.

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December 2014

Laser Damage II

Guest Editors:

Vitaly Gruzdev
University of Missouri
Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
E2412 Lafferre Hall
Columbia, Missouri 65211
E-mail: gruzdevv@missouri.edu

Michelle D. Shinn
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility
Suite 19
12000 Jefferson Ave
Newport News, Virginia 23606
E-mail: shinn@jlab.org


Call for Papers: The Annual Laser Damage Symposia is the leading forum for the exchange of information on all aspects of laser-induced damage in materials for high power/high energy lasers. Materials include but are not limited to thin films, bulk materials, fibers, and metaoptics. The series of conference proceedings has grown to be a comprehensive source of information on optics and materials for high power-energy lasers. However, participants of the Laser Damage Symposia have expressed a strong need to publish selected presentations from the Symposia in a peer-reviewed journal. To meet that need, a Special Section on Laser DamageLeaving site was published by Optical Engineering in 2012. It received remarkable attention from readers and experts and justified publishing another Special Section on Laser Damage. This special section is open for submissions from participants of the Symposia, as well as from all interested researchers worldwide who wish to publish original and novel results in the following areas:

  • Laser-component fabrication
  • Measurements of laser-damage threshold
  • Laser-induced damage protocols
  • Optical materials for high-power lasers
  • Characterization of properties of the optical materials
  • Novel materials for high-power lasers
  • Materials for thin films and thin-film preparation
  • Thin-film durability, thin-film properties
  • Aging issues for laser optics
  • Contamination of optical components
  • Fundamental mechanisms of laser-solid interactions
  • Fundamental mechanisms of laser damage in optical materials
  • Nonlinear effects in laser-solid interactions
  • Modeling of the laser-materials interaction.

Manuscripts due 1 May 2014.

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January 2015

Fiber Lasers and Applications

Guest Editors:

Zeev Zalevsky
Bar-Ilan University
Faculty of Engineering
Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel
E-mail: Zeev.Zalevsky@biu.ac.il

Abraham Katzir
Tel Aviv University
Faculty of Exact Sciences
School of Physics and Astronomy
Ramat Aviv, Israel
E-mail: katzir@post.tau.ac.il

Yoav Sintov
Soreq Nuclear Research Center
Applied Physics Department
Yavne 81800, Israel
E-mail: sintovy@soreq.gov.il

Call for papers: Over the last two decades, fiber laser technology had several breakthroughs which turned it into an enabling technology for a large number of applications and research topics. With the fiber optics revolution for telecommunications in the 1980s, fiber optical technology became increasingly more advanced and higher quality products were achieved. The telecommunications boom in the late 1990s resulted in a dramatic boost to the technical capability of fiber optical technologies and associated optoelectronics. Radical improvements were made in superb quality, very long lifetime, and reduced price for many components: pump diode lasers, couplings, beam combiners, rotators, Bragg fiber filters, modulators, and detectors. Also, the fibers themselves have seen significant innovation over the last decade, with commercial availability of larger cores for higher power double-clad fibers for multimode pumping, producing single-mode lasers, and photonic band gap fibers for even more flexibility of fiber parameters.

The advances in these fiber optical technologies were originally targeted to communication transport applications. Nevertheless, the reliability, compactness, cost, and quality advantages also have merit for creation of novel optical sources for a large variety of industrial applications, as well as in academic research.

We invite original papers focusing on recent advances in fiber laser technology and related applications, as well as on recent advances in fiber laser components and specialty fibers. More specifically, researchers from the field are encouraged to submit their original manuscripts in research areas including, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • high-power fiber lasers
  • specialty fibers
  • components for fiber lasers
  • pulsed and ultrafast fiber lasers
  • material processing
  • applications in medicine, sensing, and more
  • ultraviolet, midinfrared, and visible light generation
  • reliability of fiber-based systems
  • combining techniques.

Manuscripts due 1 May 2014.

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March 2015

Computational Approaches to Imaging LADAR

Guest Editors:

David Rabb
Air Force Research Laboratory
AFRL/RYMM
Building 622, 3109 Hobson Way Street
WPAFB, Ohio 45433-7700
E-mail: david.rabb@wpafb.af.mil

Joseph Marron
Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems
Building E1, 2000 El Segundo Boulevard
El Segundo, California 90245
E-mail: joseph.marron@raytheon.com

Call for papers: Laser radar (LADAR) technology has advanced significantly in the last several years resulting in compact LADAR sensors with fine resolution capabilities and fast imaging rates. These advances have been enabled by improved performance of components such as lasers, detectors, and processors. Another important enabling factor has been the development of computational algorithms for LADAR image formation and data exploitation.

Computational approaches have been used to enhance both direct and coherent detection LADAR sensors. Direct-detection 3-D mapping LADAR (sometimes referred to as LIDAR) and flash LADAR systems have used computational methods to overcome spatial resolution limitations through microscanning and superresolution. Computational methods are prevalent in coherent systems that make complex-valued field measurements over physical apertures and digitally synthesize larger imaging apertures through temporal, spatial, and frequency diversity. Coherent systems also sometimes use computational methods to reduce complexity; for example, self-reference and phase retrieval techniques can be used to eliminate the local oscillator. LADAR systems also use a variety of approaches to overcome the effects of atmospheric turbulence on sensor data through phase error correction, modulation transfer function filtering, or dewarping. With higher imaging rates, there is also a need for data compression, motivating methods for compressive imaging and sampling techniques.

This special section will summarize current research on computational techniques used for the enhancement of coherent and direct-detect LADAR systems. Original and review articles are solicited in the following topics:

  • synthetic aperture LADAR
  • digital holography
  • mapping LADAR
  • flash LADAR
  • superresolution
  • aperture synthesis
  • phase retrieval
  • compressive imaging/sampling.

Manuscripts due 1 June 2014.

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April 2015

Electro-optical/Infrared System Measurement for Modeling Performance

Guest Editors:

Jonathan Hixson
Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate
Modeling and Simulation Division
10221 Burbeck Road
Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060
E-mail: jonathan.hixson@us.army.mil

Stephen Burks
Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate
Modeling and Simulation Division
Advanced Sensor Evaluation Facility
10221 Burbeck Road
Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060
E-mail: stephen.burks1@us.army.mil

David Haefner
Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate
Modeling and Simulation Division
Advanced Sensor Evaluation Facility
10221 Burbeck Road
Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060
E-mail: david.p.haefner@us.army.mil

Call for papers: Electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) system testing entails the measurements of various component and system-level parameters that systems engineers deploy in design evaluation and system performance modeling. The components of an EO/IR imaging system, such as focal plane arrays, optics, electronics, displays, filters, ROICs, etc., each contribute to the overall system performance. Accurate performance modeling and component-level trade studies require consistent measurements and the ability to identify the nature of the contribution of a system component to the systems performance. This special section of Optical Engineering is intended to provide the latest methodologies and state of the art techniques in EO/IR systems and component testing and evaluation.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement techniques, system or component level
  • Color accuracy measurement techniques
  • Minimum resolvable temperature (MRT) and minimum resolvable contrast (MRC) testing
  • Noise characterization, system or component level
  • Test equipment and calibration 
  • Stability studies.

Manuscripts due 1 September 2014.

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May 2015

Panoramic Imaging

Guest Editor:

Raghu Menon
RemoteReality Corporation
100 Northfield Drive
Windsor, Connecticut 06095
E-mail: rmenon@remotereality.com

Call for Papers: The ultrawide field of view provided by panoramic imaging techniques enables a broad range of applications, ranging from defense to medical diagnostic equipment and entertainment. Over the last decade, advancements in imaging sensor technologies, as well as the availability of powerful low-power processing architectures, have enabled an ever-widening scope of applications of panoramic imaging. New tablet- and phone-based display technologies have also expanded the availability of powerful computing platforms for panoramic video display.

The purpose of this special section is to present an overview of the current state of the art in panoramic imaging technologies, as well as detailed analysis on promising new approaches for panoramic image and video capture, processing, display, and vision.

Related topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Panoramic image and video capture technologies
  • Specialized optics for panoramic image capture, including catadioptric and distributed aperture systems
  • Algorithms and methods for producing panoramic images and video
  • Real-time processing for low-latency panoramic video
  • Panoramic video compression and distribution
  • User interfaces for panoramic video and image display
  • Applications of panoramic imaging.

Manuscripts due 1 September 2014.

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August 2015

Digital Photoelasticity: Advancements and Applications

Guest Editor:

Krishnamurthi Ramesh
Indian Institute of Technology Madras
Department of Applied Mechanics
Chennai, India 600 036
E-mail: kramesh@iitm.ac.in

Call for Papers: Proper understanding of the nature of stresses developed is crucial in design and analysis of real-world systems. Photoelasticity is a whole-field optical technique used for analyzing the stress/strain fields and has been in existence for more than 150 years. Ever since the work of Hecker and Morche in 1986, a paradigm shift in data acquisition and processing saw the emergence of digital photoelasticity. Initially, there was quite a bit of success in automating the isochromatic fringe data. Later issues related to reliable acquisition of isoclinics over the domain has been resolved with the understanding of inconsistent and ambiguous zones in isoclinic and isochromatic phase maps, respectively. New equipment and software has been designed to adopt the new methodologies. In addition, methods such as three-fringe photoelasticity and RGB photoelasticity have been developed to process data in the color domain. Confidence gained in automating transmission photoelasticity has been extended to other variants of photoelasticity.

Significant improvements in integrated photoelasticity, scattered-light photoelasticity, dynamic photoelasticity, and reflection photoelasticity have helped the scientific community in solving complex problems with greater accuracy. Digital photoelastic techniques are now capable of handling very small retardations on the order of nanometers, which could measure very low stresses in glass components. Commercial equipment has been developed for automated quality testing and inspection in the manufacturing industries.

Digital photoelastic techniques have a broad spectrum of applications in all fields of mechanics spanning from aerospace to underwater systems, biomechanical systems, civil structures, glass stress analysis, micro/nanoparticle inclusion studies, and fracture mechanics, etc. Recent advances in digital image acquisition and processing capabilities have enhanced the scope of photoelastic studies.

The objective of this special section is to bring together the recent techniques and advancements in digital photoelasticity and its applications in various domains. This will motivate and help the scientific community to solve complex problems using digital photoelasticity and to further explore the field. Original research and review articles are solicited on digital photoelasticity topics that could include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Phase-shifting techniques
  • Phase unwrapping methodologies
  • Data extraction from high-stress/strain gradient zones
  • Three-fringe photoelasticity/ RGB photoelasticity
  • Design and construction of modern polariscopes
  • Three-dimensional and integrated photoelasticity
  • Conjunction of rapid prototyping with photoelasticity
  • Variants of photoelasticity:
    • reflection photoelasticity
    • dynamic photoelasticity
    • scattered light photoelasticity
    • infrared photoelasticity
  • Innovative applications of photoelasticity:
    • Fracture mechanics
    • Stress analysis of glass/plastics
    • Biomedical applications
    • Structural engineering and micromechanics
    • Quality inspection in manufacturing industries.

Manuscripts due 1 November 2014.

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Published Special Sections:

Glass Photonics for Integrated Optics (July 2014)
Guest Editors: Maurizio Ferrari and Stefano Taccheo

Human Vision (June 2014)
Guest Editors: Eli Peli, Joyce Farrell, Stephen Burns, and Susana Marcos

Laser Sensing and Imaging (June 2014)
Guest Editors: Chunqing Gao and Dingyuan Tang

Ocean Optics (May 2014)
Guest Editor: Weilin Hou

Ultrashort Pulsed Laser and Applications Engineering (May 2014)
Guest Editors: Marcos Dantus and Gerald C. Manke II

Terahertz Physics and Applications (March 2014)
Guest Editors: Mehdi Anwar, Joseph S. Melinger, Ekmel Ozbay, and Masayoshi Tonouchi

Freeform Optics (March 2014)
Guest Editors: Groot Gregory, Craig Olson, and Florian Fournier

Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Explosive Sensing (February 2014)
Guest Editor: Augustus W. Fountain III

Optical and Hybrid Imaging and Processing for Big Data Problems (January 2014)
Guest Editors: Khan M. Iftekharuddin, Abdul A. S. Awwal, S. Susan Young, and Ghaleb M. Abdulla

Gradient-Index Optics (November 2013)
Guest Editors: Predrag Milojkovic, Stefanie Tompkins, and Ravindra Athale

High Dynamic Range Imaging (October 2013)
Guest Editors: Touradj Ebrahimi and Andrew G. Tescher

Speckle Metrology (October 2013)
Guest Editors: Ángel F. Doval, Cristina Trillo, and José Carlos López Vázquez

Space Telescopes II (September 2013)
Guest Editors: Jim Oschmann, Mark Clampin, and Howard MacEwen

Diffractive Optics and Nanophotonics (September 2013)
Guest Editor: Chunlei Du

Ground-Based/Airborne Telescopes and Instrumentation (August 2013)
Guest Editor: Helen Hall

Aero-Optics and Adaptive Optics for Aero-Optics (July 2013)
Guest Editor: Eric J. Jumper

Video Compression Technology (July 2013)
Guest Editors: Ofer Hadar and Dan Grois

Infrared Systems (June 2013)
Guest Editors: Michael Eismann and Phil Perconti

Optical Materials (May 2013)
Guest Editor: Ishwar D. Aggarwal

Target Search and Detection Modeling (April 2013)
Guest Editors: Piet Bijl, Tana Maurer, David Wilson

High-Energy Laser Systems and Components (February 2013)
Guest Editor: John R. Albertine

Laser Damage (December 2012)
Guest Editors: Vitaly E. Gruzdev and Michelle D. Shinn

Hyperspectral Imaging Systems (November 2012)
Guest Editors: John N. Lee and Christoher G. Simi

Imaging Through the Atmosphere (October 2012)
Guest Editor: Giesele Bennett

Terahertz and Millimeter Wave Imaging (September 2012)
Guest Editors: Eddie Jacobs, Roger Appleby, and Dennis Prather

Precision Optical Measurements and Instrumentation for Geometrical and Mechanical Quantities (August 2012)
Guest Editors: Kuang-Chao Fan, Rong-Sheng Lu, and Lian-Xiang Yang

Computational Imaging (July 2012)
Guest Editors: David J. Brady and Robert Gibbons

Active Imaging: Concepts, Components, and Application (June 2012)
Guest Editor: Edward A. Watson

Free-Space Laser Communications (March 2012)
Guest Editor: Hamid Hemmati

3-D and 4-D Imaging Techniques and Applications (February 2012)
Guest Editors: G. Charmaine Gilbreath and Lenny Lipton

Space Telescopes (January 2012)
Guest Editors: Mark Clampin and Kathryn A. Flanagan

Optical Design (November 2011)
Guest Editors: G. Groot Gregory and Bryan Stone

Fiber Lasers (September 2011)
Guest Editor: Dahv Kliner

Advances of Optical Metrology in the Transportation Industry (October 2011)
Guest Editors: Lianxiang Yang and Andreas Ettemeyer

Digital Holography and Holographic Displays (September 2011)
Guest Editor: Hans I. Bjelkhagen

Liquid Crystals for Photonics (August 2011)
Guest Editor: Ignacio Moreno

Integrated Optics (July 2011)
Guest Editor: Giancarlo C. Righini

Infrared Detectors (June 2011)
Guest Editors: Paul Norton and Mel Kruer

Quantum and Interband Cascade Lasers (November 2010)
Guest Editors: Jerry Meyer and Igor Vurgaftman

Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Laser (September 2010)
Guest Editors: Gregory J. Quarles and Yehoshua Kalisky


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