Anaheim Convention Center
Anaheim, California, United States
9 - 13 April 2017
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Emerging sensing and imaging technologies for pharmaceutical applications

Pharmaceutical applications at SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing 2017

Present your sensing, imaging, and photonics technologies research for pharmaceutical applications at SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing, including biosensing, hyperspectral imaging, Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopic imaging, and more.

The 2017 Call for Papers. Abstracts due 26 September. When submitting a paper, you have the opportunity to indicate if there are pharmaceutical applications for your research. SPIE will flag this content online so that attendees who may be interested can easily locate the information.

View the 2017 Call for Papers below
Take note of the below conferences with significant technical content related to pharmaceutical applications. Late submissions will be considered. Please submit as soon as possible online.
2017 Commercial + Scientific Sensing and Imaging
Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology
Advanced Environmental, Chemical and Biological Sensing

2016 Pharmaceutical applications at the event highlighted on this page:
Expo and industry sessions
Courses
Technical Presentations

Free expo and industry sessions

Come to the largest exhibition on sensing, imaging, and photonics technologies. Attend free sessions, collaborate, and find top companies who provide everything from components to the most advanced sensor systems.

Industry session focused on pharmaceuticals
The Future of Sensor Applications: from Agriculture to Pharmaceuticals, presented by MIRTHE
Emerging Markets: CMOS Based Hyperspectral Imaging in Health, Agriculture and Food Safety by IMEC
Emerging Markets: High Speed and TDI Imaging for Machine Vision, Life-Science and Scientific Applications by IMEC
Look for these companies offering pharmaceutical solutions
Click the links below to visit the respective page on our Exhibitor List
 • BaySpec, Inc.  • Newport Corporation
 • Edmund Optics Inc.  • Ocean Optics, Inc.
 • Excelitas / Qioptiq  • Ondax, Inc.
 • FLIR Systems, Inc.  • Pixelteq, Inc.
 • Hamamatsu Corp.  • Point Grey
 • II-VI Infrared  • Raptor Photonics Ltd.
 • Laser Quantum USA  • Thorlabs Inc.
 • Xenics

The free SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing Expo registration features 380 exhibitors, industry sessions, technology demonstrations, and more.

Courses

Take advantage of face-to-face instruction from some of the biggest names in industry and research. Courses priced seprately; prices increase after 1 April 2016.

Introduction to Optomechanical Design SC014
Instructor: Vukobratovich

Infrared Focal Plane Arrays SC152
Instructors: Dereniak/Hubbs 

Multispectral and Hyperspectral Image Sensors SC194
Instructor: Lomheim

Basic Optics for Non-Optics Personnel SC609
Instructor: Harding

Introduction to Infrared and Ultraviolet Imaging Technology SC1000
Instructor: Richards

Optical Systems Engineering SC1052
Instructor: Kasunic 

Statistics for Imaging and Sensor Data SC1072
Instructor: Bajorski 

Dimensionality Reduction for Hyperspectral Image Analysis SC1161
Instructor: Du

There were 35 courses and workshops planned for the 2016 event.

Technical presentations

SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing features 2,000 technical papers. The following 50+ papers have been identified as containing content that may be of interest to those looking at sensing, imaging, and photonics techologies for pharmaceutical applications; or preview all papers in the Commerical + Scientific Sensing and Imaging conference.

Papers listed in chronolgical order. Presentation times subject to change. Please check the conference website, printed program, or room sign at the meeting for the most up-to-date information.


Deconstructing and constructing innate immune functions using molecular sensors and actuators
Paper 9871-1

Author(s):  Takanari Inoue, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9871: Sensing and Analysis Technologies for Biomedical and Cognitive Applications 2016
Session 1: Biomedical Wellness Applications
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 9:00 AM

Signaling events in cells are localized and rapid. My scientific research career to date has focused on understanding how the complex signaling gives rise to intricate cellular functions in response to intrinsic and extrinsic cues. Toward this end, we have established a series of molecular sensors and actuators that enabled visualization and manipulation of target signal transduction at high spatioteompral precision. Integrated use of these molecular probes toward multitask signaling molecules in different biological contexts “deconstructed” how cells achieve sophisticated information processing using a finite set of signaling molecules within a confined space. I will recapitulate these previous studies as well as ongoing works in an emerging field termed Synthetic Cell Biology where we explore “construction” of dynamic cell functions using artificial cells.

Electrochemical sensing of an amperometric glucose sensor based on hydrothermal sol-gel synthesized ZnO nanorods
Paper 9862-1

Author(s):  Sanghamitra Mandal, Univ. of Arkansas (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 12:40 PM

THz spectroscopic imaging of chemicals through thicker obstacles
Paper 9856-2

Author(s):  Kodo Kawase, Nagoya Univ. (Japan), et al.
Conference 9856: Terahertz Physics, Devices, and Systems X: Advanced Applications in Industry and Defense
Session 2: THz Spectroscopy I
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 1:00 PM

[Invited] In 2003, we demonstrated a non-destructive terahertz spectroscopic imaging of illicit drugs hidden in envelopes using a widely tunable THz parametric oscillator, though its dynamic range at that time was less than four orders. Recently, we have realized ten orders of dynamic range using an evolved injection seeded THz parametric generator/detector. Now we can detect drugs under much thicker obstacles than before. In this report, we introduce related topics; 1) Enhanced tuning range up to 5 THz, 2) 100dB dynamic range THz detection using near infrared detector, 3) Comparison between is-TPG spectrometer and TDS, 4) THz spectroscopic imaging through thicker obstacles.

Spatial multiplexing of whispering gallery mode sensors for trace species detection
Paper 9862-2

Author(s):  Stephen Holler, Fordham Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 1:00 PM

Whispering gallery mode resonators provide a robust and sensitive platform for the trace detection of chemical and/or biological analytes. The conventional approaches exhibit some challenges in simultaneous multi-channel (i.e., multi-species) detection. We will present an alternative monitoring scheme that allows for the spatial multiplexing of whispering gallery mode resonators with the simultaneous observation of the resonance spectra from each of them. The resonance spectra and corresponding shifts due to analyte adsorption are readily observed from different spherical resonators. We will demonstrate our approach using the human papillomavirus, the causative agent of cervical and head & neck cancers.

Plasmonics-based biosensing and diagnostics systems
Paper 9862-3

Author(s):  Tuan Vo-Dinh, Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics, Duke Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 1:20 PM

Compact surface plasmon resonance biosensor utilizing a disposable injection-molded prism in a free form
Paper 9862-4

Author(s):  How-Foo Chen, National Yang-Ming Univ. (Taiwan), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 1:40 PM

Targeting at a low cost and accessible diagnostic device in clinical practice, a compact surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor with a large dynamic range in high sensitivity is designed to satisfy commercial needs in food safety, environmental bio-pollution monitoring, and fast clinical diagnosis. The core component integrates an optical coupler, a sample-loading plate, and angle-tuning reflectors is injection-molded as a free-form prism made of plastic optics. This design makes a matching-oil-free operation during operation. The disposability of this low-cost component ensures testing or diagnosis without cross contamination in bio-samples.

Bioprocess rate-based bpCO2 sensor
Paper 9862-5

Author(s):  Prosper Adangwa, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 2:00 PM

Optical sensor for rapid microbial detection
Paper 9862-6

Author(s):  Mustafa Al-Adhami, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 2:20 PM

Handheld device for rapid chemical and biological detection using designed supercharged binding proteins for thousandfold enhancement of sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR)
Paper 9862-7

Author(s):  Lori Lepak, Phoebus Optoelectronics, LLC (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 2:40 PM

We have developed a prototype of a simple, handheld, multiplexable diagnostic device for the rapid detection of chemical or biological agents, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Our device employs metasurface-bound, designed, supercharged proteins, which are engineered to undergo exceptionally large conformational changes upon specific binding of the target, to produce a 100-1000fold signal amplification relative to state-of-the-art SPR detectors. Furthermore, our device operates in transmission mode with in-line optics and disposable detector chips, making our overall system smaller and easier to use than commercially available SPR systems. Potential commercial applications include medical diagnostics, antiterrorism, forensics, environmental monitoring, agriculture, and food safety.

In-situ SERS study of Au-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide decomposition using nanostructured optical fiber
Paper 9862-8

Author(s):  Fei Tian, Stevens Institute of Technology (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 1: Chemical and Biological Sensing
Date and Time: Sunday, April 17, 2016, 3:00 PM

Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxygen source for Au-catalyzed green production of hydrocarbon oxidation. The reaction pathways over gold catalyst has yet to be experimentally confirmed. We herein utilize our nanostructured optical fiber (NSOF) cladded by nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with immobilized Au nanoparticle as a catalytic reactor and sensitive SERS probe to investigate the molecular level details during Au-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in situ. The method for stable anchoring of Au nanoparticle in AAO with optimal catalytic and SERS activities will be determined. The formation of intermediates and final products under acidic and non-acidic conditions are measured in situ at the H2O2 concentrations of 3%-30%. The resultant knowledge can aid in the derivation of the kinetic data and mechanism for Au-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

Multiplexed chiral plasmonic assays
Paper 9863-1

Author(s):  Affar S. Karimullah, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 1: Smart Materials for Sensing
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 8:20 AM

We demonstrate the use of disposable chiral plasmonic sensors for rapid diagnosis and drug discovery applications. These plasmonic sensors are fabricated using high-throughput injection molding and are applied to detect conformational changes in surface bound proteins, enzymes and antibodies due to biomolecular interactions. We also show the potential of multiplexing these sensors to yield a new label free diagnostic tool for pathogen and phenotypic screening using minute sample quantities in a single experiment.

Sensing the morphology of kidney stones; effect of pH on the morphology
Paper 9863-2

Author(s):  Narsingh B. Singh, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 1: Smart Materials for Sensing
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 8:40 AM

The process for the formation of kidney stone is very similar to the crystal growth from a solution. Typically kidneys receive 20-30% of the total arterial blood pumped by the heart. It is well known that each kidney contains millions of nephrons which purify the blood by filtering small molecules and ions and also reclaim the needed amounts of useful materials. The surplus and waste molecules and ions are left to flow out as urine. This process is very much dependent on the acidity pH of the fluids. This pH variation affects the content and amount of filtering residue and its morphology. In the present talk we have used simulated experiments using carbonate, oxides and urea to simulate and understand the morphologies of the residue filtered and coarsened in different conditions. We observed that different of morphologies of kidney stones can be explained on the basis of acidity and hydration conditions. At lower pH fat prism crystals are observed and as pH increases, long needles with large aspect ratio are observed.

Neurotechnology for monitoring and regulating sensory, motor, and autonomic functions
Paper 9836-23

Author(s):  Douglas Weber, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 6: Human-Interface Sensors and Electronics
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 8:50 AM

The rapid and exponential advances in micro- and nanotechnologies over the last decade have enabled technologies that communicate directly with the nervous system to measure and effect neural activity. DARPA’s Biological Technologies Office is continuing to push the boundaries of neurotechnology through programs investing in neural interfaces that are effective, reliable, and safe enough for long-term use in humans. DARPA’s HAPTIX program is working to create a fully implantable system that interfaces with peripheral nerves in amputees to enable natural control and sensation for prosthetic limbs. DARPA’s Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) program is investing in innovative approaches to engaging with the peripheral nervous system in minimally-to-noninvasive ways such as through the advent of novel magnetic, optogenetic, and ultrasound-based technologies. In each instance, these new mechanisms of interrogating and stimulating the peripheral nervous system are driving towards unparalleled spatiotemporal resolution, specificity and targeting, and noninvasiveness with the expectation of moving towards chronic, human-use applications in closed-loop neuromodulation for the treatment of disease.

Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region: Trial products of beans-size Fourier-spectroscopic line-imager and feasibility experimental results of middle infrared spectroscopic imaging
Paper 9855-3

Author(s):  Ichiro Ishimaru, Kagawa Univ. (Japan), et al.
Conference 9855: Next-Generation Spectroscopic Technologies IX
Session 1: Smartphone Spectroscopy
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 8:50 AM

We had already proposed and reported the little-finger size hyperspectral-camera that was able to be applied to visible and near-infrared lights. The proposed method, so called snapshot type, was able to obtain 1 dimensional spectral distribution with one frame imaging data. The proposed method has been expected to be mounted on smartphones for healthcare sensors, and unmanned air vehicles such as drones for antiterrorism measures or environmental measurements. In this report, we will mention the trial product of the beans size apparatus whose diameter was 5[mm] and length was less than 10[mm]. And also, we will discuss about the feasibility experimental results about middle-infrared spectroscopic imaging.

Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region: Sensitivity improvement of Fourier spectroscopic imaging to detect diffuse reflection lights from internal human tissues for healthcare sensors
Paper 9855-4

Author(s):  Natsumi Kawashima, Kagawa Univ. (Japan), et al.
Conference 9855: Next-Generation Spectroscopic Technologies IX
Session 1: Smartphone Spectroscopy
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 9:10 AM

We proposed the snapshot-type Fourier spectroscopic imaging for smartphone. For spectroscopic components analysis, such as non-invasive blood glucose sensors, the diffuse reflection lights from internal human skins are very weak for conventional hyperspectral cameras, such as AOTF (Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter) type. For improving sensitivity of our spectroscopic imager, the wide-field-stop & beam-expansion method was proposed. We installed concave-cylindrical lens between the wider slit and objective lens as a beam expander. We successfully obtained the spectroscopic characters of hemoglobin from reflected lights from human fingers.

Rapid discovery of peptide capture candidates with demonstrated specificity for structurally similar toxins
Paper 9863-4

Author(s):  Deborah A. Sarkes, U.S. Army Research Lab. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 1: Smart Materials for Sensing
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 9:20 AM

Peptides have emerged as viable alternatives to antibodies for molecular-based sensing due to their similar recognition ability. One advantage of using bacterial display technology is the speed to candidate peptide, further improved by semi-automation. In this work, non-toxic variants of structurally similar toxins ricin and abrin were utilized for discovery of peptide capture reagents. Several candidates targeting abrax were isolated as a result, and their binding assessed. Most of the resulting candidates bound abrax but not RiVax, demonstrating that short peptide sequences can be specific. Current progress towards discovery, understanding, and maturation of abrax/rivax peptide materials will be discussed.

A label-free optical biosensor for serotyping unknown influenza viruses
Paper 9824-4

Author(s):  Benjamin L. Miller, Univ. of Rochester Medical Ctr. (United States), et al.
Conference 9824: Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XVII
Session 1: Integrated Photonics Sensing of CBRNE Threats
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 9:30 AM

Understanding the serotype (immune reactivity) of circulating influenza viruses is an important prerequisite to the development of effective vaccines. We report the development of a label-free microarray approach to serotyping both “known” and “unknown” influenza virus strains using a pattern-recognition approach.

Organic electronics for human interface sensors
Paper 9836-25

Author(s):  George G. Malliaras, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne (France), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 6: Human-Interface Sensors and Electronics
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 9:40 AM

The field of organic electronics has made available a range of materials with properties that are suitable for human interface devices. These include mechanical flexibility, mixed ionic/electronic conduction, facile biofunctionalization, and capability for drug delivery. I will present examples of organic-based devices for recording electrophysiological and metabolic signals, in both invasive and cutaneous formats. I will also discuss ways to establish a bi-directional interface through the use of electrical and chemical stimulation. Finally, I will describe a list of research priorities and future needs, as well as the technical challenges that face the transition to system-level applications.

Development and use of genetically engineered peptides for inorganics (GEPI) for selective interfaces
Paper 9863-5

Author(s):  Bryn L. Adams, U.S. Army Research Lab. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 1: Smart Materials for Sensing
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 9:40 AM

Bacterial cell surface display has previously been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for the discovery and study of peptide-protein interactions and we have expanded this technology to include inorganic targets for the development of material specific peptides, also known as genetically engineered peptides for inorganics (GEPI). The process of GEPI discovery will be discussed, including experimental challenges unique to peptide discovery with inorganics. GEPI characterization and analysis will be presented for material sets, including an aluminum alloy and gold, and selectivity for target material demonstrated to show the potential towards tailored material interactions for multicomponent materials will be shown.

Low-cost optical platform for digital detection of biomarkers
Paper 9824-5

Author(s):  M. Selim Ünlü, Boston Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9824: Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XVII
Session 1: Integrated Photonics Sensing of CBRNE Threats
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 9:50 AM

Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS) provides the ability to detect single nanoscale particles. By extending single-particle IRIS to in-liquid dynamic imaging, we demonstrated real-time digital detection of individual viral pathogens as well as single molecules labeled with Au nanoparticles. With this technique we demonstrate real-time simultaneous detection of multiple targets in a single sample, as well as quantitative dynamic detection of individual biomolecular interactions for reaction kinetics measurements. This approach promises to simplify and reduce the cost of rapid diagnostics.

Materials and nonconventional micro-fabrication techniques for ultra-compliant peripheral nerve interfaces
Paper 9836-26

Author(s):  Christopher J. Bettinger, Carnegie Mellon Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 6: Human-Interface Sensors and Electronics
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 10:30 AM

Peripheral neural interfaces (PNI) are devices that link the information flow within the nervous systems to synthetic systems. PNI are essential components that underpin many technologies for rehabilitation and neuromodulation. This presentation will describe recent progress in materials and microfabrication processes for ultracompliant conformal electrode arrays for reliable high-resolution peripheral neural interfaces to stimulate individual nerve fascicles. Two technologies will be described: (1) synthesis and processing of elastomeric conducting polymers; (2) transfer printing of microstructures to adhesive ultracompliant hydrogel-based substrates. Structure-processing-property relationships will be emphasized.

Xerogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers for biorecognition
Paper 9863-6

Author(s):  Ellen L. Holthoff, U.S. Army Research Lab. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 2: Bioinspired Receptors and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 10:30 AM

Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be utilized as artificial recognition elements for target chemical and biological analytes of interest. Molecular imprinting involves arranging polymerizable functional monomers around a template followed by polymerization and template removal. The objective of the present work is to demonstrate the usefulness of MIPs as substitutes for biorecognition elements. The polymer materials of particular interest are sol-gel-derived xerogels. To allow for increased target recognition, the xerogel has specific functional groups, which allow for polymer interactions with the template/target molecules. The results will demonstrate the effectiveness of MIPs for the detection of proteins and biological toxins.

Smart contact lens and glasses for ubiquitous healthcare
Paper 9836-27

Author(s):  Sei Kwang Hahn, Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 6: Human-Interface Sensors and Electronics
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 10:50 AM

Among various wearable medical devices, ocular lens is greatly advantageous for healthcare applications because it can be used as an efficient interface between the human body and electronic devices. Here, smart contact lens and glasses have been developed for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes as a model system for ubiquitous healthcare. The smart contact lens was composed of a biosensor to measure a tear glucose level in real-time and a drug delivery system to deliver diabetic therapeutics. The smart eye glasses was composed of a Witricity power system and a wireless communication system. We could confirm the feasibility of smart contact lens and glasses for further theranostic applications.

Switchable interfacing of living and abiotic materials through engineered bacterial attachment structures
Paper 9863-7

Author(s):  Jessica L. Terrell, U.S. Army Research Lab. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 2: Bioinspired Receptors and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 10:50 AM

This work explored opportunities to hybridize inorganic materials with engineered bacterial cells to develop living, device-compatible systems. In nature, bacterial hair-like appendages known as fimbriae facilitate adhesion with substrate specificity and force-dependent binding strength. This cellular feature was exploited to, instead, promote selective cell adhesion to inorganic materials. To do so, materials were, in some cases, adapted to enhance fimbriae affinity. Importantly, fimbriae were also genetically modified to influence cell binding to various materials, ultimately leading to reconfigurable cell patterning. The work extends the ability to further integrate biotic and abiotic device componentry.

Quantum noise limited nanoparticle detection and the holographic optical tweezer
Paper 9824-8

Author(s):  Lars Madsen, The Univ. of Queensland (Australia), et al.
Conference 9824: Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XVII
Session 2: The Future of CBRNE Sensing: Applications of Quantum Sensing
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 11:10 AM

Biology is an important and longstanding frontier for quantum metrology, with quantum-noise limited sensitivity allowing higher signal to noise or reduced optical intensities. In this talk, I will give an overview of efforts underway in the Queensland Quantum Optics Laboratory to apply quantum-noise limited detection to biological measurements. We demonstrate a quantum noise limited nanoparticle fibre sensor capable of trapping and detecting the motion of single unlabelled biomolecules with radius as small as 5 nm and a holographic optical tweezer which makes silica spheres work as a beamsplitters imparting much higher momentum kick per photon compared with Gaussian beams.

Bio-electronic retinal prosthesis
Paper 9836-28

Author(s):  James Weiland, The Univ. of Southern California (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 6: Human-Interface Sensors and Electronics
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 11:10 AM

Retinal prosthesis have progressed from laboratory and early clinical experiments, to medical devices approved for sale by the FDA and European Union. This seminar will review the history of retinal prostheses for the blind, focusing in particular on the Argus II implant clinical trial and experiments on-going to improve the function of this device.

Bio-inspired patterned networks (BIPS) for development of wearable biosensors
Paper 9863-8

Author(s):  Eric S. McLamore, Univ. of Florida (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 2: Bioinspired Receptors and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 11:10 AM

We demonstrate a novel approach for fabricating point of care wearable electrochemical biosensors based on 3D patterning of bionanocomposite networks. To create Bio-Inspired Patterned network electrodes, we first generate fractal network models that optimize transport of network fluxes according to an energy function. Network patterns are then inkjet printed onto flexible substrate using conductive graphene ink. We then deposit fractal nanometal structures onto the graphene to create a 3D nanocomposite network using pulsed sonoelectrodeposition. Finally, we biofunctionalize the surface with proteins or aptamers using covalent bonding and demonstrate use of the biosensors to develop biosensors for measuring small molecules.

Multi-layered SERS substrates for enhanced sensing
Paper 9863-9

Author(s):  Pietro Strobbia, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 2: Bioinspired Receptors and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 11:30 AM

The development of Army relevant peptide-based surface enhanced Raman scattering sensors for biological threat detection
Paper 9863-10

Author(s):  Mikella E. Farrell, U.S. Army Research Lab. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 3: Enabling Technologies and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 1:20 PM

The utility of peptide-based molecular sensing for the development of novel biosensors has resulted in a significant increase in their development and usage for sensing targets like chemical, biological, energetic and toxic materials. There are several Army relevant biological targets for peptide-based sensing platforms, two examples are Ricin and Abrin. In this proceedings paper we will discuss the optimization of peptide capture agents for biological simulant materials and metal gold binders. The effectiveness of this bifunctional peptide will be demonstrated through surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing measurements of the capture capabilities, selectivity, material binding, and other relevant metrics.

Characterization of analytical figures of merit of a sub-diffraction limited fiber bundle array for SERS imaging
Paper 9863-11

Author(s):  Eric R. Languirand, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 3: Enabling Technologies and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 1:40 PM

Multianalyte electrochemical sensors on a monolith electrode
Paper 9863-12

Author(s):  Ravi Saraf, Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 3: Enabling Technologies and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 2:00 PM

The key advantage of electrochemical devices is the active signal due to chemical reaction allowing specific recognition of analytes with low false positives. However, only one analyte per electrode is detected. An opto-electrochemical method, called Scanning Electrometer for Electrical Double-layer (SEED), to quantitatively detect multiple, individual redox reactions on a monolith electrode will be described. By scanning a laser beam, local redox current density distribution can be quantitatively mapped to detect multiple analytes on a electrode. SEED is responsive to (redox) reactions of 0.1 atto-mole of molecules. Characteristics of SEED and application to biochemical sensing and genomics will be described.

Enabling highly conductive printed graphene electronics on flexible substrates for sweat-based biosensing
Paper 9863-13

Author(s):  Jonathan C. Claussen, Iowa State Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 3: Enabling Technologies and Sensing Platforms
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 2:20 PM

Printed electronics that utilize graphene-based inks incorporate the unique material properties of graphene (e.g., high conductivity, flexibility, strength, and biocompatibility) with the low cost and scalability of ink jet printing—making them well suited for a variety of applications including supercapacitors, thin film transistors, and biosensors. In this work we developed an exfoliated graphene ink for printable biosensors that can be selectively annealed for high conductivity. An enzymatic layer consisting of the enzyme lactate oxidase is immobilized on the working electrode (printed graphene) for subsequent lactate sensing—a biomarker associated with muscle fatigue found within the sweat. The results demonstrate the potential of graphene-printed electronics in epidermal biosensor applications.

The role of topography in guiding axon outgrowth and Schwann cell migration in PEI microchannels
Paper 9862-22

Author(s):  Paul M. Kasili, Bunker Hill Community College (United States), et al.
Conference 9862: Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIII
Session 4: Detection Techniques and Applications
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 3:50 PM

Injuries to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are devastating and can result in physical impairments, poor functional outcomes, and high levels of disability or life-long disability. Successful recovery of peripheral nerve injuries requires specific physical and molecular guidance cues. This work investigates the role of topography, as a physical cue, in guiding dorsal root ganglion (DRG) axon outgrowth and Schwann Cell (SC) migration in polyetherimide (PEI) channels. This work successfully demonstrates the role of topography in PEI-based neural guidance micro-channels in guiding axonal outgrowth and SC migration from DRG.

Predictive modeling in clostridium acetobutylicum fermentations employing Raman spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis for real-time culture monitoring
Paper 9863-17

Author(s):  Theresah N. K. Zu, U.S. Army Research Lab. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 4: Bacterial & Metabolic Sensing
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 4:10 PM

The coupling of optical fibers with Raman instrumentation has been demonstrated to be effective for real-time monitoring of chemical reactions as well as different fermentation cultures when combined with multivariate statistical data analysis. Raman spectroscopy is of interest because, the technique is relatively fast with little interference from the water peak present in fermentation cultures. Medical research has explored this technique for analysis of mammalian (Chinese Hamster Ovarian –CHO) cultures for potential diagnosis of some cancers. Other organisms that have been studied via this route include Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and some Bacillus sp., though very little work has been done in the area of Clostridium acetobutylicum. C. acetobutylicum is a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium which is highly sought after due to its ability to utilize different carbohydrate substrates in return and produce useful byproducts through the well-known Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In this work, real-time Raman data was acquired from C. acetobutylicum cultures (wild type and a mutant) grown on glucose as the sole carbon source. Samples were collected concurrently using manual sampling for comparative off-line product analysis. Partial-least squares (PLS) models were built for both agitated cultures and static cultures from both datasets for different reaction components; (i) glucose, (ii) butyrate, (iii) acetate, and (iv) butanol. Models were cross-validated with independent datasets. Experiments with agitation were more favorable for modeling with goodness of fit (R2Y) values of 0.99 and goodness of prediction (Q2Y) values of 0.98.Static experiments did not model well and were chaotic especially at time points where manual samples were acquired.

Modelling and implementation of a fixed-length-extension to measure fluorescent intensity in bioprocesses using an optical sensor
Paper 9863-18

Author(s):  Neha R. Sardesai, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore County (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 4: Bacterial & Metabolic Sensing
Date and Time: Monday, April 18, 2016, 4:30 PM

Fluorescent proteins are often used as reporters of protein concentration in biology and biomedicine applications. They can be detected using a fluorometer equipped with fiber optics for ease of access. However, small changes in the path length due to change in the position or immersion depth of the optical fiber results in large changes in readings. To alleviate the situation, the fiber is equipped with a fixed-length-extension that provides constant path length. The operation of the fiber equipped fluorometer is theoretically modelled and practically verified in this paper.

Applications of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to defense and security
Paper 9824-16

Author(s):  Jason A. Guicheteau, U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Ctr. (United States), et al.
Conference 9824: Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XVII
Session 4: Optical Methods for Security Applications
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 8:00 AM

Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) allows for sub-surface and through barrier detection and has applications in drug analysis, cancer detection, forensic science, as well as security and defense. This paper reviews previous efforts in SORS and other through barrier Raman techniques and presents a discussion on current research in defense and security applications.

Soft electronics for the human body
Paper 9836-40

Author(s):  John A. Rogers, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 9: What Killer Applications Can Flexible-Stretchable-Reconfigurable Electronics Offer?
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 8:00 AM

Biology is soft, curvilinear and transient; silicon technology is rigid, planar and everlasting. Electronic systems that eliminate this profound mismatch in properties create opportunities for devices that can intimately integrate with the body, for diagnostic, therapeutic or surgical function with important, unique capabilities in biomedical research and clinical healthcare. Over the last decade, new concepts in materials science, mechanical engineering, manufacturing and device design has led to the emergence of diverse classes of ‘biocompatible’ electronic systems. This talk describes the key ideas, with examples ranging from wireless, skin-like electronic ‘tattoos’ for continuous monitoring of physiological health to bioresorbable electronics for nerve stimulation and intracranial monitoring, to electronically 'instrumented' balloon catheters for interventional cardiology.

New sampling methods for Raman handheld instruments
Paper 9824-17

Author(s):  Keith Carron, Snowy Range Instruments (United States), et al.
Conference 9824: Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XVII
Session 4: Optical Methods for Security Applications
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 8:30 AM

New methods of Raman sampling for handheld instruments will be presented. Specifically the methods of Orbital Raster Scan (ORS), stepped ORS, Dynamic Raman Scattering (DRS), ORS-DRS, and Spatially Resolved Raman Scattering will be discussed. These new sampling methods greatly enhance the ability of portable handheld Raman instruments to function with SERS analysis, with complex heterogeneous sample, with taggants, and with materials contain within an interfering barrier.

Application of the Black-Scholes equation in pharmaceutical engineering
Paper 9863-19

Author(s):  Esteban Higuita, Univ. EAFIT (Colombia), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 5: Pharmaceutical and Point-of-Care Sensing
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 8:40 AM

The Black-Scholes equation is applied in pharmaceutical engineering. The Black-Scholes equation is a classic equation in computational finance. In this work certain case of a modified Black-Scholes equation is analytically solved in the context of a problem of absorption of a drug by a tissue. The analytical solution is obtained using computer algebra specifically Maple. The solution is written as one series of associated Laguerre polynomials. In the procedure the Kummer M functions are used. The analytical solution is numerically tested and using experimental data is possible to estimate the pharmacological parameters of the tissue. We claim that our analytical solution will have important applications in pharmaceutical engineering.

Developing portable Raman spectroscopy methods for identification of raw materials used in pharmaceutical development and manufacturing
Paper 9863-20

Author(s):  Michael Dotlich, Eli Lilly and Co. (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 5: Pharmaceutical and Point-of-Care Sensing
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 9:00 AM

Portable raman instrumentation has quickly evolved over the past 10 years where sample testing that once occurred in the laboratory is now executed in the field (e.g. warehouse). In most cases, the method develop is easily accomplished in the laboratory where the instrument and method are then transferred to field for sample analysis. Qualitative raman methods for material identification utilize libraries for sample to standard comparison. When developing raman libraries for raw material identification, great care is required when considering the factors (e.g. instrument type, raman capability, container type, container interference, background interference, material variability) that influence the identity of the material.

Molecular isotopic engineering (MIE): Industrial manufacture of naproxen of predetermined stable-isotopic compositions for reasons of identity and security
Paper 9863-21

Author(s):  John P. Jasper, Nature's Fingerprint (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 5: Pharmaceutical and Point-of-Care Sensing
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 9:20 AM

We have developed four patented or patent-pending generations of stable-isotopic methods and technologies: (i) product characterization (for both small molecules and biologics), (ii) process characterization (process patent protection), (iii) in-process (continuous) analysis, and now (iv) molecular isotopic engineering. Early work in cooperation with the US FDA on the product characterization of naproxen revealed manufacturer-level isotopic provenance of this small analgesic molecule (Wokovich et al., 2004) which was referred to as “The Manufacturer’s Fingerprint.” This isotopic provenance represented the convergence of the effects of the stable-isotopic compositions of starting materials and isotopic effects of the synthetic process. We take a proactive approach to purposefully determine the stable-isotopic composition of bio/pharmaceutical products. The main rationale for MIE is to predetermine the isotopic ranges of products for reasons of product identification and of product security, and also for intellectual property considerations.

A paper based graphene-nanocauliflower hybrid composite for point of care biosensing
Paper 9863-22

Author(s):  Eric S. McLamore, Univ. of Florida (United States), et al.
Conference 9863: Smart Biomedical and Physiological Sensor Technology XIII
Session 5: Pharmaceutical and Point-of-Care Sensing
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 9:40 AM

In this manuscript, we demonstrate the synthesis and application of Pt nano cauliflower-functionalized graphene paper for use in electrochemical biosensing of small molecules (glucose, acetone, methanol) or detection of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) in food samples. Fractal platinum nanostructures were formed on the reduced graphene oxide paper, producing a conductive paper with an extremely high electroactive surface area.

Cut-and-paste manufacture of multifunctional epidermal electronic systems
Paper 9836-46

Author(s):  Nanshu Lu, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 9: What Killer Applications Can Flexible-Stretchable-Reconfigurable Electronics Offer?
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 10:50 AM

Epidermal electronics is a class of noninvasive skin-mounted, tattoo-like sensors and electronics capable of continuous vital sign monitoring and long-term human-machine interface. The high cost of manpower, materials, vacuum equipment and photolithographic facilities associated with its manufacture greatly hinders the widespread use of disposable epidermal electronics. We have invented a cost and time effective, completely dry, benchtop “cut-and-paste” method for the green, freeform and portable manufacture of multiparametric epidermal sensor systems (ESS) within minutes. This versatile method works for all types of thin metal and polymeric sheets and is compatible with any tattoo adhesives or medical tapes. The resulting ESS are multimaterial and multifunctional and have been demonstrated to noninvasively but accurately measure electrophysiological signals, skin temperature, skin hydration, as well as respiratory rate.

Wearable electronics for personalized diagnostic and physiological monitoring
Paper 9836-47

Author(s):  Ali Javey, Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 9: What Killer Applications Can Flexible-Stretchable-Reconfigurable Electronics Offer?
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 11:10 AM

The number of interconnected devices, equipped with sensing and actuation functionalities, are expected to grow beyond thousands of units per person by 2020. Hence, personalized networks of devices can be realized, where the desired functionalities are fully integrated into the wearable and surrounding objects as per individuals’ needs, and the subsequently collected data can be used to keep the individuals informed of their daily activities and physical and health states. Accordingly, novel manufacturing processes are required for on-demand creation of smart objects, and non-invasive sensing methods are needed for continuous health monitoring of individuals. Aligned with this vision, we demonstrate a low-cost printing process that enables on-demand creation of personalized smart objects with integrated silicon ICs to achieve system-level functionalities. In one example system, we present a fully-integrated and wearable perspiration analyzer that simultaneously measures a panel of electrolytes and metabolites in sweat and can provide insight into the physiological state of individuals in real-time.

Stretchable electronics for invasive and wearable healthcare devices
Paper 9836-49

Author(s):  Dae-Hyeong Kim, Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 9: What Killer Applications Can Flexible-Stretchable-Reconfigurable Electronics Offer?
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 11:50 AM

Recent advances in soft electronics have attracted great attention due in large to the potential applications in personalized, bio-integrated healthcare devices. The mechanical mismatch between conventional electronic/optoelectronic devices and soft human tissues/organs causes many challenges, such as the low signal to noise ratio of biosensors because of the incomplete integration of rigid devices with the body, inflammations and excessive immune responses of implanted stiff devices originated from frictions and foreign nature to biotic systems, and the huge discomfort and consequent stress to users in wearing/implanting these devices. Ultraflexible and stretchable electronic devices utilize the low system modulus and the intrinsic system-level softness to solve these issues. Here, we describe our unique strategies in the synthesis of nanoscale materials, their seamless assembly and integration, and corresponding device designs toward wearable and implantable healthcare devices. These implantable and wearable bioelectronic systems combine recent breakthroughs in unconventional soft electronics to address unsolved issues in the clinical medicine, which provides new opportunities the personalized healthcare.

Particle-tracking microrheology: fundamentals and new applications
Paper 9836-51

Author(s):  Denis Wirtz, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 1:30 PM

A multitude of cellular and subcellular processes depend critically on the mechanical deformability of the cytoplasm. We have recently introduced the method of particle tracking microrheology, which measures the viscoelastic properties of the cytoplasm locally and with high spatiotemporal resolution. Here we establish the basic principles of particle tracking microrheology, describing the advantages of this approach over more conventional approaches to cell mechanics. We present basic concepts of molecular mechanics and polymer physics relevant to the microrheological response of cells. Particle tracking microrheology can probe the mechanical properties of live cells in experimentally difficult - yet more physiological - environments, including cells embedded inside a 3D matrix, adherent cells subjected to shear flows, cells inside a developing embryo. Particle tracking microrheology can readily reveal the lost ability of diseased cells to resist shear forces. We will also present novel applciations of particle-tracking microrheology to monitor phenotypic changes in tumors at the single-cell level in living subjects.

Characterization of nanoparticle targeted delivery and trans-endothelial capability through a biomimetic microfluidic device
Paper 9836-52

Author(s):  Yaling Liu, Lehigh Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 1:50 PM

This talk covers multiscale characterization, evaluation, and design for adhesion dynamics of nanoparticles and cells. Nanoparticulate systems have been widely used in diagnostic imaging and targeted therapeutic applications in recent years. One of the major challenges in nanomedicine is to improve particle selectivity and adhesion efficiency under complex vascular flow conditions. We developed an integrated microvascular mimetic microfluidic testing platform to evaluate nanoparticle targeted delivery under vascular flow. A monolayer of endothelium cell is formed in the channel and activated locally through TNF-α to mimic the physiological diseased region. NP binding dynamics under a range of shear rates are characterized to evaluate the targeting efficiency. We aim to provide a systematic design and evaluation tool toward a virtual vascular platform for nanomedicine testing.

Diamond-based multifunctional nanosensing platform
Paper 9836-53

Author(s):  Ophir Gaathon, Diamond Nanotechnologies, Inc. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 2:10 PM

For a variety of applications in biomedical research there is a need for better imaging and sensing tools that can report on activities at the nanoscale. In many instances, such as in neural activity imaging, it is desirable to record those dynamics in real time over a wide field of view while resolving features below the diffraction limit. This multi-scale challenge is compounded with performance issues of current probes such as photostability, cytotoxicity or low contrast. A potential candidate to overcome those barriers is the multifunctional diamond nanosensor. The unique sensing capabilities of diamond are derived from fluorescent atomic defect centers in the diamond lattice. One of those color centers is the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. By optically interrogating the electronic spin state of those centers we can probe the local environment. To do so, we employ a specially designed rapid pulse sequences in a manner similar to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques but on normal optical microscopes. We can engineer these nanosensors to be non-bleaching optical reporters of small changes in charge density, electric and magnetic fields and temperature. Here we will discuss our recent development of electric field diamond nanosensors. We will also report on our efforts towards realizing a robust sensing and imaging platform that is based on these new kind of high performance diamond probes.

Multifunctional combinatorial-designed nanoparticles for nucleic acid therapy
Paper 9836-54

Author(s):  Mansoor Amiji, Northeastern Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 2:30 PM

Tremendous advances in molecular and personalized medicine also present challenges for translation of innovative experimental approaches into clinically-relevant strategies. In this talk, I will cover several of our strategic approaches for development of multifunctional engineered nano-systems for targeted therapies in the treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases. Specific examples will include: (1) overcoming tumor multidrug resistance using a combinatorial-designed engineered nano-systems for RNAi and chemotherapy, (2) genetic modulation of macrophage phenotype to promote anti-inflammatory effects in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and (3) oral anti-TNF gene silencing therapy using multicompartmental delivery system for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

Cancer nanotheranostics
Paper 9836-55

Author(s):  Xiaoyuan Chen, National Institutes of Health (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 2:50 PM

Cancer nanotheranostics combines nanobiotechnology and cancer biology, aiming for early diagnosis, accurate molecular imaging, and precise treatment at the right timing and proper dose, followed by real-time monitoring of treatment efficacy. This talk provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of cancer nanotheranostics from the design of nanobiosensors for ultrasensitive biomarker detection in vitro, application of molecular imaging techniques for in vivo measurement of cancer hallmarks, image-guided cancer interventions, to nanoparticle platforms for co-delivery of imaging labels and therapeutic genes and drug molecules. The challenges of clinical translation of cancer nanotheranostic are also briefly discussed.

Ultra-high sensitivity imaging of cancer using SERRS nanoparticles
Paper 9836-56

Author(s):  Moritz F. Kircher, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 3:40 PM

We have developed novel generations of biocompatible "surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy" (SERRS) nanoparticles with so far unprecedented sensitivity of detection for oncological imaging. This has resulted in our ability to visualize, with a single nanoparticle, many different cancer types in mouse models that closely recapitulate human disease. We were able to visualize not only the bulk tumors, but importantly also microscopic extensions and locoregional satellite metastases, thus delineating for the first time the true extent of tumor spread. Moreover, the particles have shown the ability to detect premalignant lesions and thus hold promise to improve cancer early detection and complete resection.

Nanoparticle formulations for image-guided drug delivery to brain tumors
Paper 9836-57

Author(s):  Tyrone Porter, Boston Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 4:00 PM

The presence of the blood-tumor barrier (BTB) severely limits the delivery of circulating drug-loaded nanoparticles into brain tumors. To overcome this hurdle, nanoparticles can be decorated with a mixture of ligands that facilitate receptor-mediated transcytosis. Alternatively, circulating microbubbles driven with ultrasound can temporarily disrupt the BTB, providing a pathway for nanoparticle diffusion. Moreover, the incorporation of contrast material into the nanoparticle allows for monitoring extravasation and accumulation within intracranial tumors. Combining the proposed strategies for circumventing the BTB with novel multifunctional nanoparticles will expand the range of anticancer agents that may be utilized in the treatment of brain tumors.

Multifunctional nanoconstructs for biomedical applications
Paper 9836-58

Author(s):  Tayyaba Hasan, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 4:20 PM

This talk will present a nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery, which is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents.

IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer
Paper 9836-59

Author(s):  Lily Yang, Emory Univ. (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 4:40 PM

Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs (doxorubicin and cisplatin) into human tumors have been developed. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer and triple negative breast cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models, while near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses.

Early detection and longitudinal imaging of cancer micrometastases using biofunctionalized rare-earth albumin nanocomposites
Paper 9836-60

Author(s):  Prabhas Moghe, Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 5:00 PM

Current clinical imaging techniques are unable to detect micro-metastases due to limited depth penetration and molecular fidelity. We demonstrate the ability of rare earth nano composites with targeting to preferentially accumulate in tumor lesions and image lesion dynamics in vivo. The probes also detect early micro-metastatic lesions in long bones and spine of animals prior to their detection via conventional imaging techniques such as CT. Findings from this study support the promise of the “new window” imaging platform and suggest future clinical translatability for nanomedicine.

Imaging and nanomedicine in inflammatory atherosclerosis
Paper 9836-61

Author(s):  Zahi A. Fayad, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (United States), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session 10: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Biomedical Research
Date and Time: Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 5:20 PM

Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive disease, affecting the medium and large arteries. The complications of atherosclerosis are leading causes of death worldwide. Research into the process of atheroma lesion development and maturation has implicated many immune cells and uncovered new pathways that can serve as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets. This talk will provide an introduction to molecular imaging and nano-medicine and will discuss how recent discoveries in atherosclerosis immunology can provide opportunities for diagnostic imaging of atherosclerotic plaques, including translatable molecular imaging techniques. Furthermore, it will describe how these pathways can be specifically modulated by nano-medicine based interventions.

HELICoiD project: A new use of hyperspectral imaging for brain cancer detection in real-time during neurosurgical operations
Paper 9860-1

Author(s):  Himar Fabelo, Univ. de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain), et al.
Conference 9860: Hyperspectral Imaging Sensors: Innovative Applications and Sensor Standards 2016
Session 1: Hyperspectral Sensing and Imaging Sensors I
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 8:00 AM

Hyperspectral images allow obtaining large amounts of information about the surface of the scene that is captured by the sensor. Using this information is possible to determine the substance that is located in each pixel. The HELICoiD (HypErspectraL Imaging Cancer Detection) project is a European FET project that has the goal to develop a real-time demonstrator capable to discriminate between healthy and tumour tissues during neurosurgical operations. This demonstrator will help neurosurgeons to accurately determine the tumour boundaries in the process of brain tumour resection, avoiding excessive extraction of healthy tissue and the accidental leaving of small tumour tissues.

NIR chemical imaging and data aggregation for real-time monitoring of pharmaceutical tablet manufacturing
Paper 9860-2

Author(s):  Patrick R. Wahl, RCPE GmbH (Austria), et al.
Conference 9860: Hyperspectral Imaging Sensors: Innovative Applications and Sensor Standards 2016
Session 1: Hyperspectral Sensing and Imaging Sensors I
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 8:20 AM

A high-speed near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) camera is used to monitor up to 500.000 tablets per hour during pharmaceutical manufacturing. The system consists of a push-broom spectrometer (EVK Helios CLASS G2) and an image analysis software. It is forwarding aggregated data, mean content of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), its standard deviation (SD) and the number of analyzed tablets, to a process control system (PCS). Spectral analysis is performed in real-time on the onboard FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array). Therefore chemometric models are transferred to the spectrometer. The resulting video stream is further analyzed via openCV, an image processing library.

Measurement of experimental visible spectra using a compact high-resolution micro-spectrometer on chip
Paper 9836-104

Author(s):  Thomas Diard, ONERA (France), et al.
Conference 9836: Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Session PSWed: Interactive Poster Session: Wednesday Evening
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 6:00 PM

There is a need for compact, hand-held, spectrometers for the measurement of spectral signatures of chemicals or objects. To achieve this goal, ONERA and IPAG have developed a new micro-spectrometer on chip operating in the visible spectral range with a high spectral resolution (near 2 cm-1). It is directly inspired from the MICROSPOC infrared spectrometer, studied at ONERA in the past years. This spectrometer is made of a stair-step two-wave interferometer directly glued on a CMOS detector making it a very compact prototype. After calibrating the optical path difference, measurements of experimental spectra are presented.

Automated quantitative analysis of red blood cell 3D geometric changes in the storage lesion using digital holographic microscopy
Paper 9867-37

Author(s):  Inkyu Moon, Chosun Univ. (Korea, Republic of), et al.
Conference 9867: Three-Dimensional Imaging, Visualization, and Display 2016
Session PWed: Interactive Poster Session: Wednesday Evening
Date and Time: Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 6:00 PM


Important Author Dates

Abstracts Due
Late submissions will be considered. Please submit as soon as possible online.

Author Notification
5 December 2016

Manuscripts Due
13 March 2017


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