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Optical Design & Engineering

Flat, IR optics

Sydor Optics

Sydor Optics announces it will feature its newest developments in flat, IR optics at the SPIE Defense, Security & Sensing show in Baltimore, Md., May 5-9. This conference and exhibition showcases optics, IR imaging, lasers and sensing for defense, security, industry, healthcare, and the environment.

Specializing in double-side polishing process, Sydor has achieved transmitted wavefront better than 0.25 wave at 3.39μm for windows 4 to 10 inches in diameter and has recently received inquiries for windows up to 14 inches in diameter. Sydor is also developing flat IR optics with germanium substrates. The company continues to supply high-volume optical windows and optics for television and IR cameras for turret camera pods on air, land and water based vehicle applications. Other recent defense applications for Sydor's flat optics include mirrors for military flight simulators, laser protection filters and transparent armor.

All of Sydor's processing currently involves double-side polishing to achieve optimal parallelism and transmitted wavefront specifications. In the near future, Sydor plans to add single-side polishing for optics that require superior surface flatness.

Other IR materials processed include germanium, AMTIR 2 and 3 and some chalcogenide materials. The second most-processed IR material has been germanium with our capabilities currently limited to parts under 6 inches in diameter.

www.sydor.com