Search Tips: How you can improve your search results

Viewing Search Results for Conferences & Exhibitions

Viewing Search Results for Conferences & Exhibitions


Search Tips for Specific Information
How to Use Advanced Logic in Your Keyword Search
Rules for keyword searching

Search Tips for Specific Information
  • How to Find Conferences & Exhibitions
    You can enter parts of conference names, relevant keywords, locations, and chair or committee member names to search for conferences and exhibitions. For example: Anderson "Photonics West"

  • How to Find a Paper or Publication
    You can enter relevant keywords, paper titles, author names or ISBNs to search for SPIE publications.  ISBNs should not include spaces or hyphens. For example: 9780819437235 Fischer "Optical System Design" 

  • How to Find Relevant Courses
    You can enter relevant keywords, course titles, instructor names or conference names to search for SPIE Courses. For example: "Electron-Beam Lithography" Smith "Photonics West"

  • How to Find Members
    After becoming an SPIE member you will be able to search for members in the membership section. You can enter name, company, or address information in the available search fields to help find a member. 

  • Newsroom Articles
    You can enter keywords, article titles, author names or relevant phrases to help you find articles of interest. To limit your search to a particular technical community, click the advanced search link to the right of the keyword search and check the technical communities of interest.

How to Use Advanced Logic in Your Keyword Search
  • Using Quotes
    Search for exact phrases by enclosing them in quotation marks. For example: "Photonic Devices" "Solar Energy"

  • Using the 'AND' Operator 
    Search for results that contain all the terms by using the word AND between the terms you provide. For example: "Solar Energy" AND Optomechanics

  • Using the '&' Operator
    Using the ampersand symbol (&) will work just as the word AND does to ensure your results contain all of the terms you provide. For example: "Solar Energy" & Optomechanics

  • Using the 'OR' Operator
    Search for results that match any of the terms by using the word OR between the terms you provide. For example "Solar Energy" OR Photovoltaic

  • Using the '|' Operator
    Using the pipe symbol (|) will work just as the word OR does to ensure that your results contain any of the terms you provide. For example: "Solar Energy" | Optomechanics

  • Using the 'NOT' Operator
    Search for results that exclude a term by using the word NOT before that term in the keywords or phrases you provide. For example: "Solar Energy" NOT "Thin-film Coatings"

  • Use the '()' Symbols
    Use parentheses to group words when you are using the OR or NOT operators. For example: (Solar AND Photovoltaic) NOT Organic

Rules for keyword searching
  • All Searches Are AND Searches
    A keyword search looks for results that contain every term entered in the keyword text box. If you get too many results for nanoclinics, try searching for nanoclinics nanobiophotonics instead.

  • Quotes May Achieve More Precise Results
    The search engine treats every term as a separate word. If you are searching for a phrase, place quotes around the words. For example if you get too many results for Solid State Lasers, try searching for "Solid State Lasers" instead.

  • Common Words Are Ignored
    The search engine ignores most punctuation marks that are not used as advanced search logic and all common (noise) words that are unlikely to improve results. Noise words in English include: a, an, be, by, for, get, make, of, when, where, etc.  You may include an omitted word by using it in a phrase surrounded by quotation marks. For example: "types of interferometers"

  • Keyword Searches Are Limited to 255 Characters
    Search phrases are limited to 255 characters. Any characters provided beyond 255 will be ignored.