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Nanotechnology

Frank Koppens: Manipulating light with graphene

With potential uses from photovoltaics to integrated optical circuits, new discoveries can be quickly applied.
6 December 2012, SPIE Newsroom. DOI: 10.1117/2.3201212.01

Frank Koppens is Assistant Professor and Nano-optoelectronics group leader at the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) in Barcelona, Spain. He obtained his PhD in experimental nanoscience and quantum computation at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University (Cum Laude, 2007), in the Netherlands. His PhD work includes several breakthroughs on coherent control of single spins in semiconductor quantum dots.

As an IQSE postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University he worked on quantum plasmonics with single quantum dots and diamond color centers, with a major breakthrough on the electrical detection surface plasmon polaritons and single plasmon sources. In August 2010, he became a group leader at ICFO.

Koppens is author of 28 refereed papers (H-index 18). He specializes in graphene opto-electronics and nano-photonics, and reported the first real-space images of propagating and gate-tunable optical plasmons in graphene. Koppens received the prestigious Huygens award for his work on quantum information processing and nanotechnology.

Frank Koppens wasawarded a European Research Council Starting Grant in 2012 to pursue his project "Carbon Light". The project aims to bridge the unique nano-optical and nano-electronic properties of graphene to capture and manipulate light at extremely small scales and to reveal the intriguing physics of quantum electrodynamics at the level single electrons and photons, trapped into nano-structured graphene. He also received the Christiaan Huygens science prize for Physics in 2011.