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Optoelectronics & Communications

Dirk Englund: Developing quantum technologies in scalable semiconductor systems

Storing and moving information are the main goals for quantum memories, which will be key to future networks.

27 August 2015, SPIE Newsroom. DOI: 10.1117/2.3201508.02

Dirk Englund received his BS in Physics from California Institute of Technology, and his MS in electrical engineering and PhD in applied physics, both from Stanford University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University until 2010, when he became Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics at Columbia University. He moved to MIT in 2013 as Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and a member of the Research Laboratory for Electronics and the Microsystems Technology Laboratories. His recent recognitions include the 2011 Sloan Research Fellowship in Physics, the 2011 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the 2012 DARPA Young Faculty Award, and the 2012 IBM Faculty Award.

Englund heads the Quantum Photonics Group, which develops quantum technologies in scalable semiconductor systems. Present goals include quantum simulators using scalable silicon photonic circuits and high-performance quantum memories based on electron spins in diamond color centers, high-speed quantum key distribution, and spinoff applications in optoelectronic devices for classical information processing. The group is also pursuing new applications in precision measurements, including the development of electron spin-based timing devices and biosensors.