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Micro/Nano Lithography

Akihisa Sekiguchi: Beyond Scaling -- Opportunities and Approaches

A plenary presentation from SPIE Advanced Lithography 2014

23 April 2014, SPIE Newsroom. DOI: 10.1117/2.3201402.04

We have experienced a staggering revolution in IC manufacturing, which has equipped us with ubiquitous portable devices that boast computing capabilities exponentially greater than the room-sized mainframes from a few decades ago. Ingenuity and innovation have steadily scaled devices to today's levels. And as we look ahead, we are faced with the uncertainty of how much longer we can depend on historical scaling advances to guide us forward.

Maintaining the cadence of recent node scaling has come at a significant cost. Achieving the necessary process controls and low defectivity levels requires advanced equipment, including lithography and metrology tools, for cost effective manufacturing. Innovations such as double / multiple patterning, gridded design rules, computational methods, and source-mask optimization extend lithography beyond what was considered feasible just a few years ago. All of these components together introduce complexity and cost into current leading-edge manufacturing.

With EUVL and complementary techniques, such as DSA unproven for high volume manufacturing, a patterning path to future nodes is not clear. Are we up against a roadblock or a fork in the road? As we explore options, a number of uncertainties unfold. Can we overcome device level limitations by employing new materials, design architectures and process technologies? Will industry be able to contain escalating R&D expenditures in pursuit of scaling? And will we have a sustainable infrastructure that fosters collaborative ingenuity and innovation to ensure steady progress? During the course of my presentation, I will explore viable paths and highlight some of the essential elements necessary to propel the industry forward.

Akihisa Sekiguchi is currently Corporate Vice President and Deputy General Manager of Semiconductor Production Equipment (SPE) Marketing and Process Development at Tokyo Electron Limited. He is responsible for defining and driving internal and external corporate R&D strategies, mergers and acquisitions, corporate technology marketing, 450mm development and consortia programs.

Since joining TEL in 2007, Dr. Sekiguchi has served as senior technologist for key accounts and consortia. Additionally, he has been responsible for developing and implementing corporate R&D strategies, and merger and acquisition strategies.

He started his career at IBM in 1991, initially working on early stage development of Cu-based BEOL processes. Subsequently, he managed IBM's Cell Processor process technology, FEOL Unit/Module process development and 90nm/65nm/early 45nm SOI based process technologies.

Dr. Sekiguchi holds a B.S. and M. Eng. in Applied and Engineering Physics from Cornell University, an M.B.A in Finance from New York University Stern School of Business, and a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Columbia University.

Having lived in Honduras and Brazil, Dr. Sekiguchi speaks Spanish and Portuguese in addition to Japanese and English. He devotes his free time to his marriage, two children and tennis.

He holds several patents and is a member of IEEE and SEMI.