SPIE Startup Challenge 2015 Founding Partner - JENOPTIK Get updates from SPIE Newsroom
  • Newsroom Home
  • Astronomy
  • Biomedical Optics & Medical Imaging
  • Defense & Security
  • Electronic Imaging & Signal Processing
  • Illumination & Displays
  • Lasers & Sources
  • Micro/Nano Lithography
  • Nanotechnology
  • Optical Design & Engineering
  • Optoelectronics & Communications
  • Remote Sensing
  • Sensing & Measurement
  • Solar & Alternative Energy
  • Sign up for Newsroom E-Alerts
  • Information for:

SPIE Photonics West 2017 | Register Today

SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing 2017 | Call for Papers

Get Down (loaded) - SPIE Journals OPEN ACCESS


Print PageEmail Page

Sensing & Measurement

Amit Lal video: The pros and cons of proliferating sensors -- where are we headed?

While our sensing capabilities have expanded rapidly, so have the questions about what we do with all that data.
22 March 2011, SPIE Newsroom. DOI: 10.1117/2.3201103.03

Amit Lal is an associate professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University (Ithaca, NY). His interests are in developing concepts and technologies leading to integrated microsystems using micro and nanoscale fabrication techniques. He directs the SonicMEMS Laboratory, which works on diverse topics aimed at transforming the way world can be viewed. Topics such as (1) linear and nonlinear effects of ultrasound for microfluidics, (2) applications of radioactive thin films for power and lithography, (3) microprobes for surgery and bioinstrumentation, (4) nanoelectromechanical effects, (5) hybrid insect microsystems, (6) micromechanical solar energy, (7) and chip scale particle accelerators, are among the current foci of the group.

Lal obtained his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from Caltech in 1990. He obtained his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from University of California, Berkeley. He conducted his doctoral research at the Berkeley Sensors and Actuators Center in the area of ultrasonic MEMS. After working at University of Wisconsin-Madison as an assistant professor, he is now an associate professor at Cornell University, in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He holds 17 patents and has published >145 research papers in the area of microsystem engineering. Most recently, he served as a Program Manager at DARPA in the Microsystems Technology Office, from 2005-2009. At DARPA he started six new programs in the area of navigation, low-energy computation, bio-robotics, and atomic microsystems. He is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award, as well as the Department of Defense Exceptional Service Award, and a Best Program Manager Award for his work at DARPA.

He was interviewed for SPIE Newsroom at SPIE Photonics West in January, 2011.