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Course Description Format

SPIE is an Accredited Provider of Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for its short courses. In order to conform to the standards set by IACET, the International Association for Continuing Education and Training, SPIE requires a specific format for its course descriptions.

The instructions below explain the procedure for writing your course description, section by section.

Course Title

The course title must be interesting to the potential student. The title should reflect the core course content.

Description

A short (1-2 paragraph) abstract of the course contents, detailing items such as an overview of the course topic, the problems it can solve, and examples of applications for the technology or approach. Keep the description in the active voice, and remember that the audience is typically composed of professional engineers rather than researchers. A clear, engaging, and well-written description can make a real difference in the success of your course.

Learning Outcomes

Each course should have 3 to 8 learning outcomes. Learning outcomes are written statements that describe what the student should be able to do at the conclusion of the presentation. Each objective should be measurable and specific. For example, the student will be able to "List and compare the basic benefits of fiber optic sensor technology." Each statement MUST contain an action verb - avoid using "understand" as the opening word in each bullet, as it is not a measurable outcome. Examples of action verbs are listed under each category as a guide for preparing the learning outcomes:

Knowledge
identify
name
define
describe
list
Comprehension
classify
explain
summarize
predict
distinguish
Synthesis
combine
compose
design
construct
formulate
Analysis
diagram
separate
infer
differentiate
estimate
Application
compute
demonstrate
solve
modify
operate
Evaluation
compare
judge
justify
conclude
discriminate

Keep in mind that the brief quiz you are asked to submit should measure student achievement of these outcomes.

Intended Audience

The intended audience should be described in terms of job function or title as well as any education or work experience prerequisites. Please limit to 1-2 complete sentences.

Course Level

Indicate if the material content is Introductory, Intermediate, or Advanced. Please note that we are not able to accommodate 'split' level designations such as "Introductory/Intermediate" or "Intermediate/Advanced".

Course Length

Please indicate whether you think a half-day (3.5 hours of instruction) or a full day (6.5 hours) will be needed to cover the course content.

Instructor

Instructor's biography should be a short paragraph that indicates the instructor is qualified to present a course on the material and establishes credibility as a teacher. Include current or most recent positions and current degree held, not a full work history.

Additional Comments

If applicable, please indicate any special materials such as a separate textbook or CD-ROM that are included with your course. It is not necessary to specify the standard course materials (printout of the presentation slides).

Complete Short Course Description Example

Radiometry Revealed

This course explains basic principles and applications of radiometry and photometry. A primary goal of the course is to reveal the logic, systematic order, and methodology behind what sometimes appears to be a confusing branch of optical science and engineering. Examples are taken from the ultraviolet through the long-wave infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Anyone who wants to answer questions such as, "how many watts or photons do I have?" or "how much light or radiation do I need?" will benefit from taking this course.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

This course will enable you to:

  • describe the fundamental units and quantities used to quantify electromagnetic radiation at wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet, through the visible, to infrared
  • use and convert between radiometric and photometric quantities
  • calculate areas and solid angles to determine the energy, energy density, or brightness in an optical measurement or system
  • explain the role of rays, stops, and pupils in defining the field of view and light-gathering capability of an optical system
  • determine the throughput of an optical system and use it in radiometric calculations
  • quantify the radiant energy in optical images from point and extended sources
  • transfer radiant energy into and throughout optical systems
  • identify radiometric standards and calibration methods
  • be familiar with radiometers and photometers

INTENDED AUDIENCE

Scientists, engineers, technicians, or managers who wish to learn more about how to quantify radiant energy in optical systems and measurements. Undergraduate training in engineering or science is assumed.

COURSE LEVEL

Introductory

COURSE LENGTH

Half-day (3.5 hours); .35 CEU

INSTRUCTOR

Joseph A. Shaw has been developing optical remote sensing systems and using them in environmental and military sensing for two decades, first at NOAA and currently as professor of electrical engineering and physics at Montana State University. Recognition for his work in this field includes NOAA research awards, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and the World Meteorological Organization's Vaisala Prize. He earned a Ph.D. in Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. Dr. Shaw is a Fellow of both the OSA and SPIE.

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Continuing Education Units

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As an IACET Accredited Provider, SPIE offers CEUs for its programs that qualify under the ANSI/IACET Continuing Education Standard.


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