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SPIE Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 event news and photos

 

SPIE Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015: The week's highlights from Toulouse

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Fully engaged through the final day

Fabio Bovenga
Fabio Bovenga was among speakers who presented on the final day of the conference.

Talks in conference rooms were well attended, with networking going full on and participants fully engaged in conference activities.

In the conference on SAR Image Analysis, Modeling, and Techniques, Fabio Bovenga, CNR ISSIA, spoke on multitemporal SAR interferometry for landslide analysis requirements and prospects from recent satellite missions (9642-20).

Bovenga also presented a tutorial in the conference on Thursday afternoon, giving an introduction to SAR interferometry for ground motion analysis on Thursday afternoon.

Christopher Neale, University of Nebraska Lincoln, chaired a session on Vegetation Modeling, in the conference on Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology. Neale will serve as Remote Sensing chair in 2016, following this year's chair, Charles Bostater.

Jose Silvan Cardenas Yu Zhao
José Silvan Cardenas Yu Zhao

Speakers in the session included José Silvan Cardenas from the Centro de Investigacion en Geografia y Geomatica "Ing. Jorge L. Tamayo" A.C, who spoke on modeling canopy reflectance through multiple scattering approximation, providing a case study of coniferous forest in the Mexico Valley (9637-53).

Next in the session was Yu Zhao from Hitachi, Ltd., who spoke on a robust sugarcane yield prediction method using time series satellite imagery (9637-54).

A session on Processing, part of the Target and Background Signatures conference, was chaired by Miranda van Iersel from TNO Defence, Security and Safety.

Sreeja S. from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay presented on precision targeting in guided munition using IR sensor and MmW radar (9653-22), and Peter Wellig spoke to the capacity audience on real-time object detection and tracking in omni-directional surveillance using GPU (9653-23).

In a session on Missions and Technologies in the Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites conference, Tony Hull of the University of New Mexico spoke on material choices and resulting dimensional stability of optical systems in orbit (9639-58). The work was done in cooperation with Schott AG and featured a comparison of the performance of optical materials including Zerodur for optics in space applications.

Miranda van Iersel
Miranda van Iersel introducesa session on Processing in Target and Background Signatures.

 

Underwater communications

Underwater communications, which play an important roles in fields as diverse as the oil and gas industry, deep-sea exploration, and the military, were discussed in the conference on Advanced Free-Space Optical Communication Techniques and Applications.

Jeng Shiuh Cheong and his colleagues at the University of Sheffield investigated the use of AlInP-based avalanche photodiodes (APD) as detectors for underwater communication systems (9647-28). Traditional systems are acoustic-based but optical systems promise higher data rates, longer transmission range, and silent communications.

Light-based systems, however, suffer from attenuation and scattering, even near the transmission maximum of 480nm. Detectors in such systems require high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), low power consumption, and small, robust construction.

APDs have higher sensitivity than do their PIN diode counterparts due to impact ionization effects. Silicon APDs suffer from ambient light sensitivity and a wide spectral range requiring the use of optical filters thereby increasing cost and complexity.

Cheong and his co-authors fabricated AlInP APDs on GaAs substrates. The resulting detectors demonstrated capabilities consistent with what is needed for underwater detectors and represent a promising step forward in making underwater communication systems a viable alternative to traditional methods.

 

Mid-IR sources in countermeasures

The first talk of the Wednesday afternoon keynote session in Technologies for Optical Countermeasures was by Eric Park from Q-Peak Inc., on technical advancement of high power in 2- to 5-micron sources (9650-21). Park provided background on defense-oriented applications for higher-power mi-IR sources including IR countermeasures and directed energy, and non-defense applications such as free-space communications, medical and dental, spectroscopy and remote sensing, and material processing.

Park introduced the ISLA European Commission-funded project under which many partners across Europe advance technologies relating to mid-IR technology, and discussed the current state of the art with a focus on Tm and Ho fiber lasers. He reflected on progress in power scaling of mid-IR wavelengths in particular that Tm and Ho fiber lasers have provided in accessing new power levels previously not available.

 

Semiconductor lasers for DIRCM

In the second talk of the keynote session, Hans Dieter-Tholl, Diehl BGT Defence GmbH & Co. discussed semiconductor lasers for DIRCM -- directional IR countermeasures (9650-22).

Tholl provided a review of the potential applications that, in addition to optical countermeasures, covered detection of hazardous materials and air monitoring. He reviewed various schemes for reaching mid-IR wavelengths, comparing efficiency and complexity of the systems and showing how improvements in performance and reduction in complexity can be achieved by using direct diode systems.

Tholl reviewed current state-of-the-art performance for semiconductor lasers operating in the mid-IR with a focus on quantum cascade lasers, and concluded with a review of power scaling options including beam combining techniques. He postulated that future developments would be in linear arrays and stacks of QCLs for use in far-field beam combining systems.

 

Unmanned and unattended sensing

Manijeh Razeghi
Manijeh Razeghi gave a keynote talk on QCL advances.
Panos Datskos
Panos Datskos

The opening keynote session in Unmanned/Unattended Sensors and Sensor Networks included talks by by George NcNamara of the U.S. Naval Undersea Warfare Center (9647-1) on next-generation sensors and sensor networks, and Manijeh Razeghi of Northwestern University (9647-19) on recent breakthroughs in quantum cascade lasers.

Conference chair Panos Datskos of Oak Ridge National Lab gave a talk on chemical detection using IR quantum cascade lasers (9647-2).

 

Signal detection of pollutants

One important application in the use of remote sensing systems over bodies of water is the detection of pollutants. Given their environmental impact, detecting oil spills is particularly important, but this proves challenging for both optical and microwave methods because spills manifest as dark regions in the data and can be easily confused with other phenomena.

Helmi Ghanmi of Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Techniques Avancées Bretagne described in the conference on Remote Sensing of the Ocean, Sea Ice, Coast Waters, and Large Water Regions an analytical method designed to study the electromagnetic (EM) field information in both clear and polluted water under different environmental conditions (9638-1).

Ghanmi's group studied the variation in bistatic scattering coefficients in the presence of oil under varying wind conditions. In low wind speeds, they demonstrated a decrease in the scattering coefficients dependent upon scattering angle between clean and contaminated surfaces.

In high winds, which tend to emulsify oil and sea water, the analysis again demonstrated a difference in bistatic scattering coefficients between regions with and without oil.

 

SAR data processing

Claudia Notarnicola Max Frioud Roberta Anniballe
Claudia Notarnicola Max Frioud Roberta Anniballe

In a joint session on Data Processing in conferences SAR Image Analysis, Modeling, and Techniques and Image and Signal Processing for Remote Sensing, session chair Claudia Notarnicola introduced speakers including Max Frioud from the University of Zurich (9642-10), on implementation of a fast-time domain processor for FMCS synthetic aperture radar data, and Roberta Anniballe of the Sapienza Università di Roma, on an object oriented approach to detect earthquake damage in urban area: application to Cosmo SkyMed imagery of L'Aquila earthquake (9642-11).

 

Combined sensing in cultural heritage studies

Combining remote sensing techniques can result in a powerful analytical toolbox for a variety of applications. Cultural heritage studies benefit from this combining of methods, bringing history to life.

Valentina Raimondi of Istituto di Fiscia Applicata Neilo Carrara discussed one such study in her presentation describing work on a 14th century monastery near Florence (9644-12), in the conference on Earth Resources and Environmental Remote Sensing/GIS Applications.

Fluorescence lidar imaging was combined with imaging techniques including IR thermography, 3D electron tomography, UV, VIS, and IR multispectral spectroscopy, and georadar to study fresco wall paintings and stone artifacts in the monastery's chapel, the sole remaining building of the original structure.

Lidar was used to identify areas of interest. Point measurement methods such as FORS (fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy) and LIF (laser induced fluorescence) spectroscopy enabled detailed examination for such purposes as compound analysis and molecular species identification.

At the site, modalities such as georadar and 3D electron tomography were combined to enable the researchers to reconstruct the boundaries of the main nave of the church.

All data were made available in a multimedia tool to enable presentation and dissemination of the results with the added benefit of showcasing the value of fusing sensing and imaging modalities to gain a complete picture.

 

Signature phenomenology

Sean Stewart Gerald Wong Berndt Bartos
Seán Stewart Gerald Wong Berndt Bartos

A new conference, Target and Background Signatures, chaired by Ric Schleijpen (TNO Defence, Security and Safety) and Karin Stein (Fraunhofer IOSB), included speakers such as Seán Stewart from Nazarbayev University in Kazakhstan. Stewart spoke on a comparison of the relative merits of the midwave and longwave IR bands for various target types using detected thermal contrast (9653-17).

Also speaking in the session on Signature Phenomenology were Gerald Wong from the UK Met Office, on the Havemann-Taylor fast radiative transfer code and its application within tactical decision aids, and Berndt Bartos, Fraunhofer IOSB, on FTOM-2D: a two-dimensional approach to model the detailed thermal behavior of nonplanar surfaces.

 

Modern fibre-optic lidar explores harsh environments

Keynote speaker Chris Hill of Malvern Lidar Consultants opened the Emerging Technologies session of the Electro-Optical Remote Sensing, Photonic Technologies, and Applications conference by discussing how continuing advances in telecom industry and computing have impacted the growth and sale of compact lidars for commercial and defence applications (9649-23).

Referring to modern fibre-optic lidars as compact white boxes that are less complicated, reliable, and cheap than their predecessors, Hill highlighted the broad possibilities of their utilization for non-line-of-sight sensing in harsh environments.

For example, the lidar unit may be mounted on the turbine as well as on turbine blades to profile the incoming wind in challenging environments such as mountains, deserts, and floating platforms. Describing his vision for next-generation technologies, Hill said that remote sensing will provide the winning combination, when radar and lidar will work together to cover a much larger spectrum of aerosol sizes.

 

Sustainable resource management

Chaired by Markus Boldt, Fraunhofer IOSB, the Environmental Monitoring Concepts session of the Earth Resources and Environmental Remote Sensing/GIS Applications conference Tuesday morning brought together scholars from different parts of the world pursuing cutting-edge research towards developing remote sensing techniques to monitor environment and earth's resources.

In the session, Aggeliki Kyriou of University of Patras discussed the results of a supervised classification algorithm developed for flood mapping using the multispectral data acquired from Sentinel-1 and made comparisons with the Landsat-8 data (9644-4).

In another presentation, Aire Olesk from Regio, Ltd., discussed the effects of seasonal dynamics over different forest types and demonstrated results of using low-cost and potentially faster technology -- TanDEM-X -- as an alternate to lidar technology for forest height estimation applications (9644-5).

The session highlighted various current and emerging applications of the remote sensing technology, such as power-line corridor monitoring, wetland mapping, estimating of forest value, developing green house inventories, and estimating above-ground forest biomass for reporting of reliable CO2 emission measurements.

 

Noninvasive analysis of pasture quality

Alasdair Mac Arthur

An invited talk by Alasdair Mac Arthur (above), University of Edinburgh provided a dynamic and engaging critique of field spectroscopy and its challenges and opportunities, in a session on Hyperspectral, Spectroscopy, and Fluroescence (9637-5).

In agricultural regions, pasture quality is a critical feature to characterize, noted the next speaker, Rajasheker Reddy Pullanagari (Massey University) in the conference on Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems and Hydrology (9637-6). Pasture quality contributes directly to livestock performance, provides information on fertilizer needs, and is tied to methane emissions.

Rajasheker Reddy Pullanagari
Rajasheker Reddy
Pullanagari

Remote sensing enables noninvasive characterization of pastures. In particular, hyperspectral imaging provides both spatial and spectral information quickly over large regions, enabling a rapid study of vegetation properties. Pullanagari described use of an airborne hyperspectral imaging system with spectral range of 380-2500nm and 1m spatial resolution at an altitude of 660m to conduct a case study of farmland in New Zealand.

The results demonstrated the potential to measure and characterize pasture quality parameters such as crude protein and metabolizable energy based on canopy reflectance data. Such a system holds the promise of enabling near-real-time decision-making by farmers to improve farm profitability and sustainability.

Antonino Maltese (Università degli Studi di Palermo) chaired the session.

 

Optics through the atmosphere

Uwe Adomeit and Karin Stein
Uwe Adomeit and Karin Stein
Feng Wang John Gonglewski
Feng Wang Bernhard Ernstberger

In Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems, conference chair Karin Stein (Fraunhofer IOSB) introduced speakers in the opening session, including Leif Humbert (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.) who spoke on "Estimation of the refracation index structure parameter Cn2 via image analysis of a point source" (9641-2).

Next up was Uwe Adomeit (Fraunhofer IOSB) talking on shortwave infrared for night vision applications (9641-3).

In a session on Optical Systems chaired by John Gonglewski (European Office of Aerospace Research and Development), speakers included Feng Wang (China Academy of Engineering Physics), on analysis of perspective elongation for a sodium laser guide star (9641-13); and Bernhard Ernstberger (Toptica Photonics AD) talking about their robust sodium guide star laser system that is just being commissioned at major ground-based European Southern Observatory telescope locations (9641-14).

 

Practical security in quantum systems

Marco Lucamarini
Marco Lucamarini

As quantum technologies mature, the importance of securing QKD channels becomes increasingly important, said Marco Lucamarini (Toshiba Research Europe Ltd.), in the conference on Quantum Information Science and Technology (9648-41).

Breaches in transmitter or receiver can compromise data. Lucamarini studied the example of a "Trojan horse" attack on the transmitter as a specialized example of the general shielding problem. In this case, the intruder probes the transmitter by sending in a light signal and studying the reflected signal.

A three-step methodology bounding the input signal with a physical mechanism, relating the input signal to the output signal with parameters controlled by the transmitter, and relating the output signal to privacy amplification was described to address this situation.

The work demonstrated the need for practical solutions, and represents another step forward in making quantum technology a reality in our daily lives.

 

Exhibition: Taking a close look at the latest technology

Security + Defence exhibition

The two-day Security + Defence exhibition opened on Tuesday, with suppliers from throughout the industry showing the latest in technology innovations.

Security + Defence exhibition

Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 exhibition Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 exhibition
Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 exhibition Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 exhibition
Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 exhibition Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 exhibition

 

Image fusion for studying cities, ice sheets

Ana Maria Ilesi
Ana Maria Ilesi

Image fusion -- the processing and merging of data from different modalities -- offers the advantage of a more complete description of the subject under study. In the conference on Image and Signal Processing for Remote Sensing, Yansong Liu of the Rochester Institute of Technology described combining airborne lidar with high-resolution aerial color imaging to study complex urban regions (9643-35).

Lidar features were derived from 3D point clouds while color information was extracted from RGB images. A Gaussian processes classification method was utilized and demonstrated to perform well compared to Support Vector Machine methods in terms of accuracy and feature class, albeit at a higher computational cost.

The work demonstrated the power of sensor fusion techniques and the benefit of exploring alternative classification processes in analyzing the data.

Earlier in the session on Data Fusion, Ana Maria Ilesei (Università degli Studi di Trento) spoke on multiresolution fusion of radar sounder and altimeter data for the generation of high-resolution digital elevation models of ice sheets (9643-33).

 

Natural macromolecules revolutionize electro-chemical devices

In the conference on Optical Materials and Biomaterials in Security and Defence Systems Technology, keynote speaker Agnieszka Pawlicka (Universidad de São Paulo) reported on work in developing bio-inspired materials novel electro-chemical applications and demonstrated means to characterize their electrical, chemical and optical properties (9652-34).

Pawlicka highlighted recent work on developing camouflage-pattern electro-chemical devices to make the research more suitable for military and security applications. She also provided a glimpse of the great potential of bio-inspired materials towards the development of environment-friendly dye synthesized solar cells.

 

Hyperspectral cameras for new capabilities

Andrey Kanaev Armande Polo Fossi
Andrey Kanaev Armande Polo Fossi

Chaired by Robert Grasso (EOIR Technologies), a session on Military Applications of Hyperspectral Imaging and High Spatial Resolution Sensing in the conference on Electro-Optical Remote Sensing, Photonic Technologies, and Applications opened with an invited paper by Andrey Kanaev, U.S. Naval Researh Lab (NRL). Kanaev spoke on compact full motion video hyperspectral cameras, a new class of cameras that opens broad possibilities in military and industrial application (9649-27).

Later in the session, Armande Pola Fossi (ONERA) spoke on design prototype development of a compact hyperspectral imaging spectrometer for mid-IR applications (9649-30).

 

Assessing 3D images

Speakers in a session on Active and Spectral Systems in the conference on Electro-Optical and Infrared Systems included Antoine Coyac, ONERA, who spoke to a capacity crowd on performance assessment of simulated 3D laser images using Geiger-mode avalanche photo-diode: tests on simple synthetic scenarios (9648-4).

Also speaking in the session was Ian Hales (University of the West of England) who discussed long-range concealed object detection through active covert illumination (9648-5).

 

THz study of adhesives for wound closure

Neil Salmon Marie Tobolova
Neil Salmon Marie Tobolova

Chair Neil Salmon (MMW Sensors Ltd.) opened the conference on Millimetre Wave and Terahertz Sensors and Technology with a welcome and introduction of the first speaker, Marie Tobolova (University of Zlin).

Tobolova's talk on THz time-domain spectroscopy for studying the kinetics of tissue adhesives focused on those adhesives supporting hemostasis and wound closure during surgery (9651-2). Time of curing plays an important role in those circumstances, with varying requirements for speed of vessel closure. Knowing the exact time of curing of a specific glue is a key factor.

 

DNA: from biology to biotronics

While the discovery of DNA has impacted the field of biology the most, its recent contributions to defence applications have also been significant in attracting great traction from researchers all over the world.

The emerging field of organic photonics has highlighted DNA as an attractive functional biopolymer because it can form a complex with functional molecules such as organic dyes, metal complexes, and conductive polymers, said Norihisa Kobayashi (Chiba University), opening speaker in the Biotronics session of the conference on Optical Materials and Biomaterials in Security and Defence Systems Technology (9652-30).

Kobayashi highlighted a wide spectrum of applications of DNA as a photonic material: bio-LEDs exhibiting single- and multi-color emission, flexible memory devices, gate dielectrics, and more. Organic photonic devices are quickly approaching the efficiency and stability of their conventional inorganic counterparts.

Optics and Electro-Optics session chair Attila Szep, U.S. Air Force Research Lab (AFRL), presented results on fabrication and characterization of a UV photodetector from DNA-based biopolymer using inkjet printing technology, on behalf of the authors from the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology and AFRL (9652-37). The presentation highlighted how the DNA-UV ink was fabricated and deposited on electrodes. The high performance and stability of the printable UV photo-conducting material demonstrated the potential of DNA based biopolymer as a matrix for other printable materials.

 

State of the industry: innovation and contributions

Paul Winstanley
Paul Winstanley

The UK Defence Solutions Centre (UK DSC) is a unique partnership between the UK government and the UK defence industry, said Paul Winstanley, the Centre's Innovations Director and opening speaker in Tuesday afternoon's Industry Session.

Winstanley highlighted defence innovation measures towards photonics technology integration and developments, noting a paradigm shift from early capital-intensive defence technologies to more recent small- and medium-scale commercial markets.

Discussing the changing relationship between the civil-military innovation and knowledge-transfer, Winstanley outlined innovation challenges related to autonomy, big data management, and surveillance that defence would face while sourcing, acquiring, and integrating technologies that have already been exploited in commercial markets.

In the session's second talk, Stephen Anderson (SPIE) updated industry data photonics and defence manufacturing, part of an ongoing initiative of the society.

Giving a thorough biennial review of the photonics-enabled markets with a primary focus on the defence and security segment, Anderson highlighted the metrics such as geo-distribution, company size, job numbers, and revenue generated, to illustrate the overall impact of photonics on the global economy.

 

A classic, from the archives

Roland Meynart and SPIE Proceedings Vol. 210 Roland Meynart, chair of this year's
conference on Sensors, Systems, and
Next-Generation Satellites, holds a copy
of SPIE Proceedings Vol. 210
(
2nd European Congress on Optics
Applied to Metrology, published in 1980),
which includes his first-ever paper, “Flow
velocity measurement by a speckle
method.” He found the volume recently
while cleaning out his attic, but it
is more widely available
via the SPIE Digital Library.

 

Aisles and aisles of poster to explore

Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception

Tuesday evening drew attendees to the well-attended poster session in the Salle Concorde.

Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception

Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception
Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception
Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence 2015 poster reception

 


Classifying terrain density

Christina Grönwall

Among speakers in the well-attended conference on Electro-Optical Remote Sensing, Photonic Technologies, and Applications was Christina Grönwall of the FOI-Swedish Defence Research Agency (above), who spoke on sensing and imaging for UAVs (9649-1).

José Silvestre Silva of the Portuguese Academia Militar described efforts in developing algorithms pertaining to feature extraction and identification for understanding terrain vegetation density and elements in aerial photographs based on the use of various classifiers (9649-9).

Terrain can play a crucial role in military planning. Often aerial photography is the only data available, and the rapid, accurate processing of this information can be a critical step in laying out an operation. Silva demonstrated that a sparse multinomial logistic regression scheme worked best in classifying terrain density while linear techniques fared poorly. His team's results suggest that varying resolutions of this multiscale problem lead to different classifiers providing optimal results. Analysis techniques will need to take this into consideration to provide valid output to military planners.

 

The latest in lidar technology

Upendra Singh
Upendra Singh

Lidar Technologies, Techniques, and Measurements for Atmospheric Remote Sensing conference chair Upendra Singh (NASA Langley Research Center) opened the session on New Developments, and gave the first talk, on double-pulsed 2-micron IPDA lidar validation for atmospheric CO2 measurements  (9645-1).

Also in New Developments sessions, Graham Allan from Sigma Space gave an update on developing the CO2 Sounder lidar as a candidate for the ASCENDS Mission (9645-4), and Tatsuo Shiina of Chiba University reported on work with an LED mini-Raman for hydrogen gas detection (9645-9).

 

Real-time hyperspectral imaging broadens remote sensing horizons

High-performance computing techniques, widely used in molecular biology, artificial intelligence and climate modelling, are finding applications in real-time hyperspectral remote sensing, in which the hyperspectral camera collects high-resolution spectral information consisting of hundreds of bands ranging from the infrared to the ultraviolet.

While the hyperspectral camera aids in acquiring a wealth of spatial and spectral information, the analysis and interpretation of these large data-sets is often computationally cumbersome, noted Daniel Madroñal of Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (9646-4) in the conference on High-Performance Computer in Remote Sensing.

Madroñal reported on the use of the RVC-CAL library to simplify analysis. Algorithms were implemented for dimensionality reduction and spectral signature extraction, giving the user more flexibility to manage and parallelize the imaging process.

While the methodology was generic, applying hyperspectral imaging to detect brain cancer during surgery was the main focus of the presentation. This work was undertaken as part of the European HELiCoiD (HypErspectraL Imaging Cancer Detection) project with the aim to use hyper-spectral imaging towards real-time identification of tumor margins during surgery, thus minimizing the re-occurrence rates and improving the overall surgical outcome.

Valeriy Strotov Tobias Lange
Valeriy Strotov
Tobias Lange

The session opened with a talk by Valeriy Strotov, Ryazan State Radio Engineering University, on the implementation of a multiple object tracking algorithm based on partition of bipartite graph in FPGA-based onboard vision systems (9646-1).

Later in the session Tobias Lange from Technische Universität Braunschweig gave a talk on a fault-tolerant NAND flash memory module for next-generation scientific instruments.

 

Advances in high-power lasers

Salman Rosenwaks, Boris Zhadanov
Salman Rosenwaks, left, and Boris Zhadanov

High-Power Lasers conference chair Willy Bohn (BohnLaser Consult) introduced speakers in a session on Lasers and Laser Architectures for Power Scaling.

First up was Stefano Bigotta of ISL ,who spoke on recent advances in Er3+:YAG solid-state heat-capacity technology, followed by Kiwamu Takehisa from O2 Laboratory, on considerations of a ship defense with pulsed COIL.

Simulations and Experiments in Diode-Pumped Alkali Lasers session chair Salman Rosenwaks (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) opened the session with a talk on supersonic diode-pumped alkali lasers (9650-10). Speaking later in the session were Boris Zhadanov from the US Air Force Academy, on low-pressure cesium and potassium diode pumped alkali lasers (9650-13), and Eyal Yacoby (Ben Gurion University of the Negev), who spoke on 3D CFD modeling of subsonic and transonic flowing-gas DPALs (9650-14).

 

Satellite mission overviews

Roland Meynart Haruhisa Shimoda
Roland Meynart Haruhisa Shimoda
Steven Neeck Masaru Hiramatsu
Steven Neeck Masaru Hiramatsu

Sensors, Systems, and Next-Generation Satellites conference chair Roland Meynart from the European Space Research and Technology Centre opened the conference with an overview of the ESA Earth observing missions (9639-1).

Fellow chairs Steven Neeck of NASA Headquarters and Haruhisa Shimoda of Tokai University also gave mission updates; Neeck on the NASA Earth science flight program (9639-6) and Shimoda on Japanese Earth observation programs (9639-10).

A talk by Masaru Hiramatsu from NEC Corporation covered the 15-year operations of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer (VNIR) remote sensing equipment, yielding data from whih to create detailed world-wide maps and change detection of the Earth's surface (9639-11).

 

Countering terrorism, fighting crime

Douglas Burgess
Douglas Burgess

Optics and Photonics for Counterterrorism, Crime Fighting, and Defence conference chair Douglas Burgess opened the first session by introducing Eric Roy from Rigaku Raman Technologies Inc., who spoke on detection of munitions-grade G-series nerve agents using Raman excitation at 1064nm (9652-1).

Later in the session, Mariachiara Carestia from Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata" spoke on multispectral analysis of biological agents to implement a quick took for stand-off biological detection (9652-3).

A session of presentations and a panel discussion commemorating longtime chair Colin Lewis was held as part of the conference. Session chair and panel moderator Gari Owen, Annwvyn Solutions, provided some background context for the discussion and introduced speakers Stepan Lucyszyn of Imperial College London (9652-9) and Vyacheslav Trofimov from Lomonosov Moscow State University (9652-10).

 

Welcome! and Congratulations!

SPIE Security + Defence 2015 symposium chair David Titterton
David Titterton
Vadim Nenashev, Klaus Schäfer
Vadim Nenashev, left, and Klaus Schäfer
Grady Tuell remote presentation
Grady Tuell, on the big screen
Reinhard Ebert and Bernard Capbern
Reinhard Ebert, left, and Bernard Capbern

Chairs of the co-located conferences on Remote Sensing (Charles Bostater of the Florida Institute of Technology)  and Sensing + Defence (David Titterton of the UK Defence Academy) Monday afternoon welcomed an enthusiastic audience to the Centre de Congrès Pierre Baudis in Toulouse to the joint plenary session.

Before the plenary talks began, Remote Sensing symposium co-chair Klaus Schäfer (Fraunhofer IOSB) presented Vadim Nenashev (Saint-Petersburg State University of Aerospace Instrumentation.

 

Hybrid lidar -- through international cooperation

Airborne lidar has evolved over the past half century to become one of the more important 3D imaging methods. In the first presentation, Grady Tuell of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) -- speaking via a remote connection -- discussed the history of bathymetric lidar and the benefits that airborne techniques have over surface techniques for applications such as nautical charting.

Although airborne methods may lack the resolution of their surface-based counterparts, they do provide data collection speed and access to difficult to reach areas.

Reminding the audience that 2015 is the International Year of Light, Tuell provided an example of an early coastal zone imaging lidar system made possible through contributions by scientists from a number of countries. The system was designed to integrate lidar data with hyperspectral and camera data and was an early example of sensor fusion.

Today, many commercially available systems can be found, and the concept of international collaboration and contributions to the field continues. As an example, Tuell described the GTRI Pathfinder lidar unit designed to provide coordinates and total propagation uncertainty information in real-time. An integrated Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode detector (GmAPD) produces a hybrid linear mode waveform making this a hybrid lidar unit -- the first of its kind.

Tuell said that 23 countries contributed in some way to the system, demonstrating that international cooperation can make important contributions to furthering existing technologies and methods.

 

Challenges of the Laser Megajoule

The challenge of bringing 176 laser beams together with 50µm accuracy and 15ps synchronization producing 1.2MJ of energy in a 10ns pulse was illustrated by Bernard Capbern, head of the Laser Department of the CEA-Laser Megajoule project. Capbern's talk was introduced by Security + Defence symposium chair Reinhard Ebert of Fraunhofer IOSB.

Capbern described architecture, components, and materials in both the laser bay and target bay of the facility, as well as positioning and alignment schemes.

The laser bay consists of a 1.05µm Nd:YAG source feeding a four-pass amplifier and a KDP-based frequency conversion unit to deliver 350nm light to the target region. Insertion tools, such as a hard x-ray imager are available for use as well with the target bay.

The project began in 2003 and the laser line entered its operational phase in October 2014 supporting two experiments per day.

 

CubeSats and their applications

CubeSats panel: Jeroen Rotteveel, Charles Bostater, Luca Maresi, Doug Liddle, Didier Alary

Panelists in a discussion on CubeSats and their applications communicated a shared sense that this new paradigm in satellite deployment allows for rapid, iterative data collection and risk-taking which encourages creative use of the technology. In individual presentations, panel members told how agencies, industries, and universities around the world continue to work with and find new opportunities for this emerging trend in satellites. Given those realities, this is a technology to watch in the future.

The panel discussion concluded the plenary session, and gave audience members a chance to discuss with panelists topics such as space debris and related regulations, and the importance of rapid access to data, even data of lower quality.

Panelists included (from left above) Jeroen Rotteveel (Innovative Solutions in Space), moderator Charles Bostater (Florida Institute of Technology), Luca Maresi (European Space Agency), Doug Liddle (In-Space Missions Limted), and Didier Alary (Airbus Defence and Space).

In the discussion, Maresi identified potential applications of these miniature satellites in precision farm and mapping flood zones, and Liddle proposed applications in change detection. Rotteveel touched on size and growth of the market and noted it is estimated that 2,000-2,750 nanosatellite units will be launched between 2014 and 2020. As the technology evolves, both applications and customer base are changing.

 

Coffee and conversation

Coffee time at Remote Sensing and Security + Defence in Toulouse

Coffee breaks provide the perfect environment in which to catch up with longtime colleagues and make new contacts.

Coffee time at Remote Sensing and Security + Defence in Toulouse Coffee time at Remote Sensing and Security + Defence in Toulouse
Martin Seifert and Stephen Anderson Gari Owen and Douglas Burgess
Martin Seifert (Nufern), at left, and
Stephen Anderson (SPIE)
at the poster reception
Gari Owen (Annwvyn Solutions), at left, and
Douglas Burgess (Burgess Consulting)
at the exhibition

 

Luminary tribute: the International Year of Light

SPIE luminary tribute: the International Year of Light

A display created by SPIE featured a tribute to optics and photonics luminaries from several centuries, in obervance of the United Nations-decreed International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies.

 

Rooftop welcome

welcome reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence

Attendees at the Monday evening welcome reception enjoyed a panoramic view of the city and a beautiful sunset, from the balconies of the Espace Vanel. Inside, the colorful light display, traditional French food, and wine provided an excellent networking environment.

welcome reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence welcome reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence
welcome reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence welcome reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence

 copyright Karin Burger: welcome reception Remote Sensing and Security + Defence
Photo © Karin Burger

 

Congratulations! 2015 Best Paper Awards

SPIE Remote Sensing 2015

Sameh Saadi Milad Niroumand Jadidi
Sameh Saadi Milad Niroumand Jadidi
Pedro Benevides Maria Kakavas
Pedro Benevides Maria Kakavas
Lydia Yatcheva Swapnesh Panigrahi
Lydia Yatcheva Swapnesh Panigrahi
Gregori de Arruda Moreira Eyal Yacoby
Gregori de Arruda Moreira Eyal Yacoby
Joyce Bou Sleiman Carestia Mariachiara
Joyce Bou Sleiman Mariachiara Carestia
  • Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology: Sameh Saadi, Institut National Agronomique de Tunis, "Monitoring irrigation volumes using high-resolution NDVI image time series: calibration and validation in the Kairouan plain" (9637-45)
  • Remote Sensing of the Ocean, Sea Ice, Coastal Waters, and Large Water Regions: SPIE Member Milad Niroumand Jadidi, Univ. degli Studi di Trento, "Subpixel mapping of water boundaries using pixel swapping algorithm (case study: Tagliamento River, Italy)" (9638-16)
  • Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere: SPIE Member Pedro Benevides, Univ. de Lisboa, "Inclusion of high resolution MODIS maps on a 3D tropospheric water vapour GPS tomography model" (9640-29)
  • Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems: Lydia Yatcheva, Fraunhofer-Institut für Optronik, Systemtechnik und Bildauswertung "Ultimate turbulence experiment: simultaneous measurements of Cn2 near the ground using six devices and eight methods" (9641-4)
  • Image and Signal Processing for Remote Sensing: Swapnesh Panigrahi, Institut de Physique de Rennes, "Noise correlation-based adaptive polarimetric image representation for contrast enhancement of a polarized beacon in fog" (9643-12)
  • Earth Resources and Environmental Remote Sensing/GIS Applications: SPIE Member Maria Kakavas, Univ. of Patras, "Karst features detection and mapping using airphotos, DSMs and GIS techniques" (9644-35)
  • Lidar Technologies, Techniques, and Measurements for Atmospheric Remote Sensing: Gregori de Arruda Moreira, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, "Detecting the planetary boundary layer height from low level jet" (9645-17).

SPIE Security and Defence 2015

  • Electro-Optical and Infrared Systems -- Technology and Applications: SPIE Member Luke Maidment, Heriot-Watt University and UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, "Stand-off detection of liquid thin films using active mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging" (9648-3)
  • High-Power Lasers -- Technology and Systems: Eyal Yacoby, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, "3D CFD modeling of subsonic and transonic flowing-gas DPALs with different pumping geometries" (9650-14)
  • Millimetre Wave and Terahertz Sensors and Technology: SPIE Member Joyce Bou Sleiman, Univ. of Bordeaux, "Discrimination and identification of RDX/PETN explosives by chemometrics applied on terahertz time-domain spectral imaging" (9651-9)
  • Optics and Photonics for Counterterrorism, Crime Fighting and Defence: Mariachiara Carestia, Univ. degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", "Multispectral analysis of biological agents to implement a quick tool for stand-off biological detection" (9252-3).

 


All photos © SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, except where noted.

SPIE Remote Sensing 2015

SPIE Security + Defence 2015

 

Click below or browse at left:

Congratulations! 2015 SPIE Best Paper Awards

Fully engaged through the final day

Underwater communications

Mid-IR sources in countermeasures

Semiconductor lasers for DIRCM

Unmanned and unattended sensing

Signal detection of pollutants

SAR data processing

Combined sensing in cultural heritage studies

Signature phenomenology

Modern fibre-optic lidar explores harsh environments

Sustainable resource management

Noninvasive analysis of pasture quality

Optics through the atmosphere

Practical security in quantum systems

Exhibition: Taking a close look at the latest technology

Image fusion for studying cities, ice sheets

Natural macromolecules revolutionize electro-chemical devices

Hyperspectral cameras for new capabilities

Assessing 3D images

THz study of adhesives for wound closure

DNA: from biology to biotronics

State of the industry: innovation and contributions

A classic, from the archives

Aisles and aisles of poster to explore

Classifying terrain density

The latest in lidar technology

Real-time hyperspectral imaging broadens remote sensing horizons

Advances in high-power lasers

Satellite mission overviews

Countering terrorism, fighting crime

Welcome! and Congratulations!

Hybrid lidar -- through international cooperation

Challenges of the Laser Megajoule

CubeSats and their applications

Coffee and conversation

Luminary tribute: the International Year of Light

Rooftop welcome

 


 

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International Year of Light 2015

 

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