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SPIE Fellow Schlesinger appointed dean at Johns Hopkins

Ed Schlesinger will become Benjamin T. Rome Dean of the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins on 1 January 2014.

25 October 2013

SPIE Fellow T.E. "Ed" Schlesinger of Carnegie Mellon University has been appointed dean of the Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.

Schlesinger is now the David Edward Schramm Memorial Professor at Carnegie Mellon University where he has been head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering since 2005. He will take up his new position at Johns Hopkins in January as the Benjamin T. Rome Dean of the Whiting School.

Schlesinger has focused his research on solid-state electronic and optical devices, nanotechnology, and information storage systems. He is a leader in research related to the development of heat-assisted magnetic recording, viewed by many as the next-generation technology for magnetic hard-disk drives.

He has published more than 250 articles and conference proceedings and holds 12 patents. He established the first GM Collaborative Research Lab at Carnegie Mellon in 2000 and, in 2007, was part of the Carnegie Mellon team whose self-driving SUV won $2 million in a DARPA Grand Challenge sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The team's vehicle outperformed 10 rival robot vehicles over a 55-mile course.

The Whiting School of Engineering recently announced that it now offers an MS degree in Engineering in Robotics to respond to industry's growing need for engineers who can design and deploy advanced robotics systems,

Schlesinger earned his doctorate in applied physics in 1985 at the California Institute of Technology. He joined the Carnegie Mellon faculty later that year.