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Nathaniel Stern of Northwestern University receives award from U.S. Department of Energy Early Career Research Program

10 June 2014

SPIE Lifetime Member Nathaniel Stern of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, USA, was among 38 researchers who recently received funding through the U.S. Department of Energy Early Career Research Program.

Stern, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, will received $750,000 over five years for his work on probing coherent states of light and matter in 2D semiconductors.

The DOE Early Career Research Program, now in its fifth year, provides funding for researchers in universities and DOE national laboratories. It supports the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and stimulates research careers in advanced scientific computing research, biological and environmental research, basic energy sciences, fusion energy sciences, high energy physics, and nuclear physics.

"I feel truly honored to be selected for this award," Stern said in a Northwestern press release. "Progress in nano-scale materials science is rapid, promising to change our outlook on what is possible when we have ultimate control of crystals at the atomic scale. The generous support of the DOE allows me the opportunity to design new quantum environments never explored before."

The recipients were chosen based on peer review of about 750 proposals.

Another DOE award recipient, Joel Rowland of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, is the co-author of the paper "Land cover classification in multispectral satellite imagery using sparse approximations on learned dictionaries," which was recently presented at SPIE DSS 2014 and is published in the SPIE Digital Library.