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SPIE BioPhotonics Australia 2016 news and photos

Updated news and photos from SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016!

 

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Welcome to Adelaide!

An evening of warm Australian hospitality at the welcome reception sponsored by RMIT University set the stage for an excellent week of talks and networking ahead.

SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016 welcome reception

Brant Gibson (CNBP/RMIT) and Mark
Hutchinson 
(CNBP/UofA) during the
welcome reception at the
University of Adelaide
SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016 welcome reception

Hans Bachor (Australian National University)
and SPIE Past President Katarina Svanberg
(Lund University Hospital)

 

 

Monday plenaries: controlling behaviour, imaging the brain

SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016: Ewa Goldys and Mark Hutchinson

Symposium chairs Ewa Goldys (Macquarie University) and Mark Hutchinson (CNBP, University of Adelaide) welcomed participants on Monday morning to the first of three plenary sessions during the week.

Yves De Koninck at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

Yves De Koninck (Université Laval)
George Paximos at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

George Paximos
(Neuroscience Research Australia)

Yves De Koninck (Université Laval) spoke on challenges in neurophotonics in deciphering how the brain processes information.

While multiple technologies are employed in the task, light-based tools represent the disruptive enabling technologies in the endeavour, De Koninck said.

He described recent work such as fluorescence fluctuation analysis techniques that yield measurements of densities and oligomerization states from tissue samples with previously unachieved precision, and multimodal fibre optics-based tools with applications ranging from single cells optogenetics to accessing hard-to-reach areas of the nervous system.

George Paximos (Neuroscience Research Australia) described work in constructing brain atlases.

Histological atlases that make use of genes that are responsible for the segmentation of the brain in development (hox genes) have provided insights for a proposing a new plan for the organization and function of certain brain regions of mammals.

Using MR images in mice and non-human primates, his group is able to provide 3D volumes of canonical brains against which transgenic varieties with clinical significance can be compared.

 

Hyperspectral imaging and detection of pathogens

Tomasz Tkaczyk at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

Tomasz Tkaczyk (Rice University)
Jim Piper at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

Jim Piper (Macquarie University)

Concurrent sessions in three conference rooms provided an expanded field of choice. Among Monday's presentations, Tomasz Tkaczyk (Rice University), at left, spoke on a snapshot hyperspectral camera for functional biological imaging, in a session on Advanced Imaging and Raman Sensing; Jim Piper (Macquarie University) spoke on rapid detection of microbial pathogens based on time-gated luminescence bioprobes, in a session on Nanostructures and Fluidics.

 

Poster connections

Poster session at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

The first of the week's two poster sessions drew a crowd
Monday evening looking to discuss work directly with authors.
Poster session at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016 Poster session at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016
Poster session at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016 Poster session at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

 

Industry networking

SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

An industry networking event on Monday evening  sponsored by the University of Adelaide served as a powerful means of connecting industry and research. Speakers included, from left above, Trajan Scientific Medical General Manager Anne Collins, University of Adelaide Vice Chancellor and President Warren Bebbington, South Australian Minister the Honorable Kyam Maher MP, CNBP Director Mark Hutchinson, and SPIE Senior Director Andrew Brown. The event host was Paul Willis, Director of RiAus and CNBP advisory board member.

Speakers stressed the significance of the investment in CNBP and the long-term economic and societal impacts of the work that will come out of the centre.

Ewa Goldys and Katarina Svanberg at SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

Ewa Goldys, left, and Katarina Svanberg

Brown applauded the vision of the Australian government funding agencies to invest in biophotonics technologies through the establishment of the CNBP, and expressed SPIE's enthusiasm as a co-organiser with CNBP of the event.

Brown recalled that SPIE Past President Katarina Svanberg and Dennis Mathews of the University of California, Davis, helped connect SPIE with Hutchinson and and the CNBP leadership in 2014, paving the way to a networking event during SPIE Photonics West in San Francisco in 2015 highlighting the research underway in Australia. From that, the concept of Biophotonics Australasia was born. Hutchinson and Ewa Goldys of Macquarie University are symposium cochairs.

 


 

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All photos © SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, except where noted.

SPIE BioPhotonics Australasia 2016

16 – 19 October 2016
Adelaide, Australia

 


Click below or browse at left:

Welcome to Adelaide!

Monday plenaries: controlling behaviour, imaging the brain

Hyperspectral imaging and detection of pathogens

Poster connections

Industry networking