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SPIE Remote Sensing and Security + Defence Event News

Nearly 750 attendees gathered for SPIE's co-located European conferences on Security + Defence and Remote Sensing 19-22 September at the Clarion Congess Hotel in Prague. Networking events included a welcome reception:

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The two-day Security + Defence Exhibition showcased 32 companies:

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Highlights of the week included four plenary talks; slides from each appear below.


SPIE Remote Sensing Plenary Session

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Above, Frank Döngi is at the podium in the first of several plenary sessions on the first day of the event.

In "Earth Observation from Space: the European Landscape in the Second Decade," Frank Döngi, head of Future Programs, Business Division Earth Observation, Navigation, and Science, at Astrium Satellites, reported on several imaging and sensing projects and missions utilizing such technologies as:

  • Atmospheric sounding to look at air pollution
  • SAR imagery and interferometry for digital elevation mapping
  • Meteorology for weather and ash cloud prediction
  • Optical imagery for commercial display purposes
  • Gravity and magnetic field for 3D Earth gravity modeling.

Among his conclusions:

  • Spaceborne Earth observation is becoming increasingly operative -- an indispensable infrastructure for data services (imagery, cartography, meteorology, environment, security).
  • Purely commercial programs hold challenges -- institutional needs define the major part of the market.
  • Civil institutions are in a process to identify the benefits of Earth observation data.
  • Scientific missions improve our understanding of complex climate mechanisms.
  • Europe needs to secure the funding for the operational phase of the GMES program.

Click on the image below to see the full set of slides:

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Paul Lewis, program manager and scientist for the Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology (ASPECT) Research and Development Program at the US National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, spoke on the "Evolution of Airborne Chemical and Radiological Remote Sensing for Emergency and Natural Disaster Response."

His examples included infrared (IR) airborne water quality assessments from flooding events such as in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, IR multispectral linescanner imaging for petrochemical infrastructure damage survey after Hurricane Rita in 2005, and airborne data processing and direct integration of data used to monitor the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Click on the image below to see the full set of slides:

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SPIE Security + Defence Plenary Session

A standing-room-only audience gathered to hear "Remote Sensing Needs for Military Operations," by Keith Lewis, UK Electro-Magnetic Remote Sensing Defence Technology Centre (EMRS DTC) research director. Lewis discussed activities at the facility to meet the goals of persistent surveillance for a wide range of scenarios, especilly in dealing with insurgency. New sensing technologies are aimed at understanding patterns of life, detecting and locating time-sensitive targets, and identifying whether individuals pose a threat to the community at large.

Lewis noted that the EMRS DTC has supported the research and development of new capabilities including radio-frequency (RF) and electro-optic (EO) systems, as well as work on sensor exploitation, with a goal of developing solutions for enhancing situational awareness.

Click on the image below to see the full set of slides:

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The talk by Miloslav Dusek, Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Science at Palacký University, focused on "Quantum Information Transfer and Processing," with particular applications in cryptography and computational problem-solving.

He noted that quantum effects offer solutions to some tasks which cannot be solved in classical information theory, e.g., secure distribution of a cryptographic key, or whose classical solution is unknown, giving factorization of large numbers in polynomial time and other "hard" computational problems as an example

Click on the image below to see the full set of slides:

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