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Proceedings Paper

Ultrasonic Isometric Imaging
Author(s): F. L. Becker; R. L. Trantow
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Paper Abstract

An ultrasonic imaging technique has been developed which produces an isometric projection of three dimensional objects on a two dimensional display device. The technique has been demonstrated by apparatus which combines X, Y and time or Z axis information from conventional C-scan type devices into the X' and Y' axes of the display device. This arrangement provides a combination of depth and spatial information in a single record which can be easily interpreted. The controls may be adjusted to view the image from any perspective. By recording the test information on a tape loop and playing it back at high speeds, the operator can select the optimum perspectives for interpretation of unknown objects and flaws. Orthographic projections can also be made. Applications and demonstrations (including successful imaging in liquid sodium) are described which clearly indicate the advantages of the ultrasonic imaging technique over conventional B- and C-scans. The technique also has some advantages over scanned ultrasonic holography in that the entire object is in focus and more accurate depth resolution can be obtained. It could also be used to good advantage to complement the capabilities of holographic techniques.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 August 1972
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 0029, Imaging Techniques for Testing and Inspection, (1 August 1972); doi: 10.1117/12.978150
Show Author Affiliations
F. L. Becker, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (United States)
R. L. Trantow, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0029:
Imaging Techniques for Testing and Inspection
John C. Urbach; Byron B. Brenden; Robert Apprahamian, Editor(s)

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