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Proceedings Paper

A Computerized System For Measuring Cerebral Metabolism
Author(s): James S. McGlone; Lyndon S. Hibbard; Richard A. Hawkins; Rangachar Kasturi
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Paper Abstract

A computerized stereotactic measurement system for evaluating rat brain metabolism was developed to utilize the large amount of data generated by quantitative autoradiography. Conventional methods of measurement only analyze a small percent of this data, because these methods are limited by instrument design and the subjectiveness of the investigator. However, a computerized system allows digital images to be analyzed by placing data at its appropriate three-dimensional stereotactic coordinates. The System automatically registers experimental data to a standard 3-dimensional image using alignment, scaling, and matching operations. Metabolic activity in different neuronal structures is then measured by generating digital masks and superimposing them on to experimental data. Several experimental data sets were evaluated and it was noticed that the structures measured by the computerized system had, in general, lower metabolic activity than manual measurements had indicated. This was expected because the computerized system measured the structure over its volume while the manual readings were taken from the most active metabolic area of a particular structure.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 December 1986
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 0697, Applications of Digital Image Processing IX, (10 December 1986); doi: 10.1117/12.976231
Show Author Affiliations
James S. McGlone, Siemens Medical Systems (United States)
Lyndon S. Hibbard, The Pennsylvania State University (United States)
Richard A. Hawkins, The Pennsylvania State University (United States)
Rangachar Kasturi, The Pennsylvania State University (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0697:
Applications of Digital Image Processing IX
Andrew G. Tescher, Editor(s)

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