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Proceedings Paper

Selective Cluster Formation In Cryogenic Matrices Monitored By FAR-IR And MID-IR Spectroscopy
Author(s): O. Schrems; M. Huth; H. Kollhoff; E. Knozinger
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Paper Abstract

Selective formation of molecular microclusters isolated in cryogenic solids is shown to be an effective way to obtain detailed information about structures and intermolecular interactions in condensed matter. New techniques are reported which allow the generation of well-defined molecular aggregates in cryogenic matrices by: (a) time- and temperature-controlled diffusion of monomeric molecules in highly diluted solid solutions; (b) condensation of "size-selective" pulsed supersonic beams, and (c) photochemical decomposition of suitable parent molecules isolated in solid inert gases. The efficiency of these methods is demonstrated with hydrogen cyanide as model system. It is shown that locally stable (HCN)n microclusters (n = 2, 3, 4) can be obtained selectively. The influence of the cluster size on intra- and intermolecular vibrational modes has been studied in detail and structural information have been derived from the spectral data. It is shown to be particularly advantageous to use a modified FT-IR spectrometer which permits the recording of mid-ir and far-ir spectra of the very same matrix sample.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 December 1985
PDF: 2 pages
Proc. SPIE 0553, Fourier and Computerized Infrared Spectroscopy, (20 December 1985); doi: 10.1117/12.970891
Show Author Affiliations
O. Schrems, Universitat Siegen (Germany)
M. Huth, Universitat Siegen (Germany)
H. Kollhoff, Universitat Siegen (Germany)
E. Knozinger, Universitat Siegen (Germany)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0553:
Fourier and Computerized Infrared Spectroscopy
David G. Cameron; Jeannette G. Grasselli, Editor(s)

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