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Proceedings Paper

Stroke-Order Independent On-Line Recognition Of Handwritten Chinese Characters
Author(s): Chang-Keng Lin; Bor-Shenn Jeng; Chun-Jen Lee
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Paper Abstract

This paper proposes an on-line handwritten Chinese character recognition system based on stroke-sequence feature extraction. The character to be recognized can be stroke-order and stroke-number free, tolerance for combined strokes, size flexible, but within the constraint of normal hand-writing. Firstly, the recognizer, using the finite state matching mechanism, is used to extract primitive strokes, represented as stroke string, from the input character. Secondly, the recognizer, using a modified dynamic programming matching method, is employed to perform recognition processes with the stroke-string features. Reference patterns have been generated 2500 Chinese characters with stroke-numbers ranging from 1 to 29. The recognition results are based upon the 1800 handwritten characters by 10 people. The obtained recognition rate is 94.5%, and the cumulative classification rate of choosing fourth most similar characters is up to 98.7%. In the last part, a secondary recognition mechanism is used to further tell apart the candidates involved. The final recognition rate may be promoted up to 99%.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 November 1989
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 1199, Visual Communications and Image Processing IV, (1 November 1989); doi: 10.1117/12.970143
Show Author Affiliations
Chang-Keng Lin, Ministry of Communications (Taiwan)
National Central University (Taiwan)
Bor-Shenn Jeng, Ministry of Communications (Taiwan)
National Central University (Taiwan)
Chun-Jen Lee, Ministry of Communications (Taiwan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1199:
Visual Communications and Image Processing IV
William A. Pearlman, Editor(s)

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