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Proceedings Paper

New Staircase Impact Electroluminescent Devices
Author(s): H. J. Lozykowski
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Paper Abstract

The staircase impact electroluminescent devices (SIED) and the staircase photon amplifier converter (SPAC) are propos6d. The devices are a multilayered heterojunction structures in which the acceleration and collision excitation processes are spatially separated and permits independent optimization of each function in different materials. In collision excitation region, ballistic electrons excite the rare earth ions by direct impact. By changing conduction band step AEc we can tune up the energy of excited electrons to the resonance condition of a particular excited state of RE3+ ions. The emission from the rare earth ions with transition wavelength shorter than semiconductor's band edge emission can be generated. The emission will contain narrow lines with gradual change in wavelength with temperature. The advantages of the new devices and excitation mechanism are discussed in detail. Both proposed devices STED and SPAC can be built using the possible combinations containing Si,III-V and II-VT compounds doped with rare earth. Laser action should also be obtainable by properly choosing device geometry. The laser oscilation at the rare earth transition assure the same wavelength from devices to devices with weak temperature dependence.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 January 1987
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 0836, Optoelectronic Materials, Devices, Packaging, and Interconnects, (1 January 1987); doi: 10.1117/12.967513
Show Author Affiliations
H. J. Lozykowski, Ohio University (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0836:
Optoelectronic Materials, Devices, Packaging, and Interconnects
Theodore E. Batchman; Richard Franklin Carson; Robert L. Galawa; Henry J. Wojtunik, Editor(s)

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