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Proceedings Paper

Relating Surface Scattering Characteristics To Emissivity Changes During The Galvanneal Process
Author(s): D. P. Hill; R. L. Shoemaker; D. P. DeWitt; D. R. Gaskell; T. F. Schiff; D. White; K. M. Gaskey
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Paper Abstract

The galvannealing of mild steel is a development of the familiar galvanizing process in which a thin coating of zinc on the surface of the steel, produced by immersion in a bath of liquid zinc, provides protection from corrosion. The zinc coating enhances surface quality as well as provides physical protection and, if the coating is ruptured, provides electrochemical protection by acting as the sacrificial anode in the bi-metallic cell. In the galvannealing process as shown schematically in Figure 1, steel strip is continuously run through a bath of liquid zinc at 465°C. Then it passes through air knives which control the thickness of the liquid zinc film and is then passed through a gas-fired galvannealing furnace, which heats the coated sheet to approximately 550° C. At this temperature the diffusion of iron into the liquid zinc causes the formation of an Fe-Zn intermetallic layer which grows and penetrates the free surface of the liquid zinc. On emerging from the furnace, the strip is air-cooled by fans and then coiled.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 January 1990
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 1165, Scatter from Optical Components, (2 January 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.962837
Show Author Affiliations
D. P. Hill, Purdue University (United States)
R. L. Shoemaker, Purdue University (United States)
D. P. DeWitt, Purdue University (United States)
D. R. Gaskell, Purdue University (United States)
T. F. Schiff, TMA Technology, Inc. (United States)
D. White, Inland Steel Company (United States)
K. M. Gaskey, Inland Steel Company (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1165:
Scatter from Optical Components
John C. Stover, Editor(s)

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