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Proceedings Paper

Lattice Mismatched Heteroepitaxial Growth Of GaAs On InP bY Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy.
Author(s): U. K. Chakrabarti; W. S. Hobson; V. Swaminathan; S. J. Pearton; S. Nakahara; M. Lamont Schnoes; P. M. Thomas
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Paper Abstract

Lattice mismatched heteroepitaxy is currently pursued to broaden the material base for integrated optoelectronic devices. We have grown GaAs on InP using atmospheric pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy. Specular mirror-like morphology is obtained when a two step pre-layer growth process is adopted. Best morphology is obtained on off-oriented substrates. The films were found to be stoichiometric as studied by Auger electron spectroscopy having a resolution of 0.1 atomic percent. The film-substrate interface, as examined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, revealed a dislocation density =1.3 x 1010 cm while that near the top surface reduced to 8.4 x 109 cm 2. The =2K photoluminescence spectra of the grown material were found to be dominated by exciton related transitions. Furthermore, we also report the reverse and forward current-voltage characteristics of a Au-GaAs-(e)InP diode structure.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 November 1989
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 1144, 1st Intl Conf on Indium Phosphide and Related Materials for Advanced Electronic and Optical Devices, (28 November 1989); doi: 10.1117/12.961986
Show Author Affiliations
U. K. Chakrabarti, AT&T Bell Laboratories (United States)
W. S. Hobson, AT&T Bell Laboratories (United States)
V. Swaminathan, AT&T Bell Laboratories (United States)
S. J. Pearton, AT&T Bell Laboratories (United States)
S. Nakahara, AT&T Bell Laboratories (United States)
M. Lamont Schnoes, AT&T Bell Laboratories (United States)
P. M. Thomas, AT&T Bell Laboratories (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1144:
1st Intl Conf on Indium Phosphide and Related Materials for Advanced Electronic and Optical Devices

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