Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Optical Channels In Distributed Processing
Author(s): Michael Inbar
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

The steadily increasing number of microprocessor controlled devices such as intelligent terminals, numerically controlled machines, etc. created the need for new approaches to the problems associated with distributing processing functions. Optical communication devices could be used in order to develop new methods to facilitate the distribution of tasks and programs among a large number of small and relatively slow machines. The essence of the approach should be to find means "to pay with bandwidth and low self induced noise" for simpler and more flexible implementation of task and program distribution. An analysis has been conducted leading to the formulation of the relationship between bandwidth, protocols, and topologies. It appears that ring and common bus topologies are the most suitable for implementation utilizing optical communication channels. An experimental fiber optic based loop system has been designed and constructed. The current realization operates at 20 Mb/sec and affords a 255 unit addressing space. The addressing space can be arbitrarily divided into physical and functional addresses. Mechanism for controllerless operation has been developed and tested. The current data rate can be increased to about 200 Mb/sec without major design changes. Measurement, simulation and analytical results are reported.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 September 1980
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 0224, Fiber Optics for Communications and Control, (19 September 1980); doi: 10.1117/12.958682
Show Author Affiliations
Michael Inbar, TRW Technology Research Center (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0224:
Fiber Optics for Communications and Control
Charles W. Kleekamp, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top