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Proceedings Paper

Plasma Deposition Of Optical Thin Films For Infrared Use
Author(s): L. Holland
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Paper Abstract

Optical coatings are required in the infra red for mirrors, anti-reflection coatings, filters and radiation absorbers. The most widely used optical coating technique is vacuum evaporation and its variant reactive evaporation. These are employed for depositing films of metals and oxide sulphide and halide compounds. Thermal evaporation imposes limitations on usable materials for reasons of compound dissociation or low volatility as for refractory metals. Evaporation in ionized activated gas can aid growth of stoichiometric compound films. Also developments in magnetron sputtering harq raised sputtering and deposition rates and with r.f. sputtering extended the range of film materials but surface damage can result when coating solid state devices from impact of energetic particles in the discharge. The foregoing processes are physical in their material emission and condensation mechanisms. Reeen4].y increased attention has bean given to chemical deposition processes in which a glow discharge is used at low gas temperature to initiate or accelerate dissociation of a gaseous compound or reaction between gases in a mixture. The work of the writer and that of others on three types of plasma deposition processes is reviewed. The processes which afford film thickness growth rates of several hundred angstrUms per minute are: plasma polymerization of hydrocatbonoilicone and fluorocarbon gases, the growth of amorphous carbon and silicon films in hydrocarbon and silane plasmas respectively and the formation of oxides and nitrides by plasma gas reactions. These processes have potential use for preparing anti-reflection films (e.g. a C-films on Ge) and polymer moisture protective films on halide crystals. Finally it is proposed that interference systems based on a Si/a C-layers could be made by plasma chemical processes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 December 1979
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 0197, Modern Utilization of Infrared Technology V, (17 December 1979); doi: 10.1117/12.958010
Show Author Affiliations
L. Holland, University of Sussex (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0197:
Modern Utilization of Infrared Technology V
Irving J. Spiro, Editor(s)

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