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Proceedings Paper

Computrol A New Approach To Computer Generated Imagery
Author(s): Ron Swallow; Roscoe Goodwin; Rudolph Draudin
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Paper Abstract

In the course of our Periscope View Simulator improvement program, ATS investigated new CGI techniques. It coincided with efforts at HumRRO. A development agreement was formulated to cooperate on a day/dusk/ night Computer Generated Image System now called COMPUTROL*. A key ingredient is the "atom" philosophy of geometric forms used as building blocks. Basic forms are stretched, squashed, lengthened and/or added to develop a particular scene. With exception of a flight data or other vehicle interface resident within the simulator "host computer", our visual system is a self-contained digital image generator with bulk storage of specific geographic areas. Current design has a 30,000 edge display capability. Surfaces can be planer, or spherical due to the ability to smooth-shade curved surfaces. There is virtually no limit to the number of edges contained within the gaming area data base. The CPU used has been especially developed to provide the computational speed necessary within our system. Use of standard MOS chips and straight-foward computer architecture have eliminated the risk normally associated with a specially designed computer system. The resulting CGI system promises to set the standard for visual simulators for many years to come.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 December 1978
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 0162, Visual Simulation and Image Realism I, (22 December 1978); doi: 10.1117/12.956884
Show Author Affiliations
Ron Swallow, Human Resources Research Organization (United States)
Roscoe Goodwin, Advanced Technology Systems (United States)
Rudolph Draudin, Advanced Technology Systems (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0162:
Visual Simulation and Image Realism I
Leo Beiser, Editor(s)

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