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Proceedings Paper

In Vivo Measurement Of Blood Oxygen Saturation By Analysis Of Whole Blood Reflectance Spectra
Author(s): A. Hoeft; H. Korb; J. Steinmann; R. DeVivie
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Paper Abstract

Reflection oximetry is usually performed by illumination of blood or tissues with monochromatic light at two wavelengths and measurement of the reflected light intensities. We investigated, whether an improvement in accuracy of measurement can be achieved by spectral analysis of the reflected light of a white light source. Flexible quartz fiber optic catheters were inserted in blood vessels. The reflected light was detected by an optical multichannel analyzer with a CCD array. The recording range was 400 to 1000 nm. All experiments were carried out in anaesthetized mongrel dogs. Oxygen saturation of arterial blood was varied by changing oxygen concentration of ventilation. Blood samples were drawn for reference measurements of oxygen saturation by an in vitro method. Three different configurations of quartz fibers were tested: 1) single fiber arrangement 2) double fiber arrangement; 3) statistically mixed fiber bundle. Below 600 nm reflection was only detectable with the monofiber configuration. Above 600 nm the reflection spectra showed considerable differences depending on fiber configuration. Highest sensivity to blood oxygenation was provided by the double and multifiber system. Analysis of blood reflection spectra can be done by two different mathematical models describing the optics of scattering and absorbing materials: 1) the theory of optical diffusion by ZDROJKOWSKI and 2) the two flux approach by KUBELKA and MUNK. It is shown, that both theories essentially yield the same results. Model computations revealed, that oxygen saturation can be determined by integrating the reflected light intensities in two wavelength ranges. This approach yielded excellent correlation with the in vitro method (r = 0.993).

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 June 1989
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 1067, Optical Fibers in Medicine IV, (15 June 1989); doi: 10.1117/12.952102
Show Author Affiliations
A. Hoeft, University of Gottingen (Germany)
H. Korb, University of Gottingen (Germany)
J. Steinmann, University of Gottingen (Germany)
R. DeVivie, University of Gottingen (Germany)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1067:
Optical Fibers in Medicine IV
Abraham Katzir, Editor(s)

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