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Proceedings Paper

Fiber Optic Versus Direct Laser Delivery For Endarterectomy Of Experimental Atheromas
Author(s): John Eugene; Marc E. Pollock; Stephen J. McColgan; Marie Hammer-Wilson; Michael W. Berns
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Paper Abstract

Direct laser energy delivery was compared to fiber optic laser energy delivery by the performance of open laser endarterectomy in the rabbit arteriosclerosis model. In Group I, 6 open laser endarterectomies were performed with a hand-held CO2 laser (10.6 pm). In Group II, 6 open laser endarterectomies were performed with an argon ion laser (488 nm and 514.5 nm) with the laser beam directed through a 400 μm quartz fiber optic. Gross and light microscopic examination revealed uneven endarterectomy surfaces and frequent perforations at the end points in Group I. In Group II, the endarterectomy surfaces were even and the end points were fused with a tapered transition. Energy density for Group I was 38 ±5 J/cm2. Energy density for Group II was 110±12 J/cm2. CO2 laser energy was better absorbed by arteriosclerotic rabbit aortas than argon ion laser energy, but it could not be as easily controlled. We conclude that a more precise endarterectomy can be performed with fiber optic delivery of laser energy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 January 1986
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 0576, Optical Fibers in Medicine and Biology I, (14 January 1986); doi: 10.1117/12.950728
Show Author Affiliations
John Eugene, University of California (United States)
Marc E. Pollock, University of California (United States)
Stephen J. McColgan, University of California (United States)
Marie Hammer-Wilson, University of California (United States)
Michael W. Berns, University of California (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0576:
Optical Fibers in Medicine and Biology I
Abraham Katzir, Editor(s)

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