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Proceedings Paper

Digital Image Manipulation, Analysis and Processing Systems (DIMAPS) A research-oriented, experimental image-processing system
Author(s): J. V. Dave
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Paper Abstract

The acronym DIMAPS stands for the group of experimental Digital Image Manipulation, Analysis and Processing Systems developed at the IBM Scientific Center in Palo Alto, California. These are FORTRAN-based, dialog-driven, fully interactive programs for the IBM 4341 (or equivalent) computer running under VM/CMS or MVS/TSO. The work station consists of three screens (alphanumeric, high-resolution vector graphics, and high-resolution color display), plus a digitizing graphics tablet, cursor controllers, keyboards, and hard copy devices. The DIMAPS software is 98% FORTRAN, thus facilitating maintenance, system growth, and transportability. The original DIMAPS and its modified versions contain functions for the generation, display and comparison of multiband images, and for the quantitative as well as graphic display of data in a selected section of the image under study. Several functions for performing data modification and/or analysis tasks are also included. Some high-level image processing and analysis functions such as the generation of shaded-relief images, unsupervised multispectral classification, scene-to-scene or map-to-scene registration of multiband digital data, extraction of texture information using a two-dimensional Fourier transform of the band data, and reduction of random noise from multiband data using phase agreement among their Fourier coefficients, were developed as adjuncts to DIMAPS.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 April 1985
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 0548, Applications of Artificial Intelligence II, (5 April 1985); doi: 10.1117/12.948411
Show Author Affiliations
J. V. Dave, IBM Palo Alto Scientific Center (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0548:
Applications of Artificial Intelligence II
John F. Gilmore, Editor(s)

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