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Proceedings Paper

Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) Instrument Overview
Author(s): Larry Burriesci; Larry Naes; Larry Springer; Bruce Steakley
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Paper Abstract

The purpose of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer is to measure the global concentrations of stratospheric species, and temperature, as a function of altitude. Of particular interest are ozone and ozone-destructive species. CLAES will detect N20, NO, NO2, N205 and HNO3 in the nitrogen family, and CFC13 (FC-11), CF2C12 (FC-12), HC1, and C1ONO2 in the chlorine family, in addition to 03, H20, CH, and CO2. This measurement set includes some of the more important source, ozone-destructive, and reservoir species in the ozone layer chemical system. CLAES is one of nine instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (LIARS), scheduled for a space shuttle launch in 1991. UARS will monitor upper atmospheric chemistry, dynamics, and energy input; and its coverage will include the antarctic spring ozone depletion region. The limb-viewing instruments, combined with the 57-degree inclination, 600 km circular orbit, will allow UARS to take measurements to 80 degrees latitude, covering H,ore than 98% of the earth's surface. CLAES will function autonomously in its science mode, collecting IR measurement data. The measurement data will be passed to the UARS observatory computers for packaging into transmittable blocks with the data from the other eight instruments. Pointing, platform stability, propulsion, telemetry, and other such spacecraft related functions are provided by UARS. Figure 1 is a configurational diagram of the CLAES instrument.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 April 1988
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 0973, Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instruments III, (27 April 1988); doi: 10.1117/12.948381
Show Author Affiliations
Larry Burriesci, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratories (United States)
Larry Naes, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratories (United States)
Larry Springer, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratories (United States)
Bruce Steakley, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratories (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0973:
Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instruments III
Ramsey K. Melugin; Warren G. Pierce, Editor(s)

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