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Proceedings Paper

Latest advances in large diameter SrI:Eu and CLYC:Ce scintillators for isotope identification
Author(s): R. Hawrami; C. Hines; I. Abselem; V. Biteman; J. Vaghini; J. Glodo; P. O'Dougherty; K. S. Shah; Nerine Cherepy; Stephen Payne; Arnold Burger; Lynn Boatner
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Paper Abstract

Scintillator crystal detectors form the basis for many radiation detection devices. Therefore, a search for high light yield single crystal scintillators with improved energy resolution, large volume, and the potential for low cost, is an ongoing process that has increased in recent years due to a large demand in the area of nuclear isotope identification. Alkaline earth halides, elpasolites and rare earth halides are very interesting because many compositions from these crystal families provide efficient Ce3+/ Eu2+ luminescence, good proportionality and good energy resolution. They also have small band-gap leading to higher light yields. Ce3+and Eu2+ are efficient, and the emission wavelengths in the 350-500 nm region matches well with PMTs and a new generation of Siphotodiodes. In this presentation, we will the present progress made in the crystal growth of these compositions, and scintillator properties of large diameter SrI2:Eu2+ single transparent crystals. The crystals were grown successfully using the vertical Bridgeman technique. Crystals with different diameters of 1”, 1.3”, and 1.5” will be discussed. SrI2:Eu was discovered a half century ago, and was recently found to be an outstanding material for gamma ray-spectroscopy with high light yield, very good non-proportionality, and excellent energy resolution. We will also discuss growth and properties of larger Cs2LiYCl6 (CLYC) crystals. Recently, it has been shown that crystals from the elpasolite family, including CLYC, can be successfully employed for a dual gamma ray and neutron detection, which is possible with the help of pulse shape discrimination (PSD). PSD allows for recognition of an incident particle’s nature based on the shape of the corresponding scintillation pulse. CLYC has the potential to minimize the cost and complexity of dual sensing gamma ray and neutron spectrometers. We also address progress in growth of CLYC crystals with large diameters (1” and 2”) that are transparent and crack free.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 October 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8507, Hard X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Neutron Detector Physics XIV, 850716 (24 October 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.945937
Show Author Affiliations
R. Hawrami, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
C. Hines, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
I. Abselem, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
V. Biteman, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
J. Vaghini, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
J. Glodo, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
P. O'Dougherty, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
K. S. Shah, Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (United States)
Nerine Cherepy, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Stephen Payne, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Arnold Burger, Fisk Univ. (United States)
Lynn Boatner, Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8507:
Hard X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Neutron Detector Physics XIV
Ralph B. James; Arnold Burger; Larry A. Franks; Michael Fiederle, Editor(s)

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