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Proceedings Paper

Optical Detection Of Surface Flaws On Extruded Cables
Author(s): LeRoy G. Puffer
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Paper Abstract

Surface quality imperfections on the conductor screen in high-voltage cable can lower performance and cause premature cable service failure. The manufacturing of such cable involves extrusion of the conductor screen onto the bare wire, followed a few feet later by a second extruder which covers the conductor screen with an insulation jacket. Consequently, inspection of the conductor screen surface quality must be made on-line in real-time with the system remaining insensitive to sources of surface noise, which are inconsequential to cable performance. A cable surface monitor has been designed, fabricated and successfully tested at the Essex Power Conductor Division of United Technologies Corporation. The system, which senses light scattered from the flawed areas, is capable of noncontact inspection of the entire 360° circumference of a moving cable. Key features include: incandescent illumination; two-dimensional solid state array detection; electronic processing of the output to "flag" flaws; and no moving parts. A chart recorder is used to provide a permanent record of the inspection; and a video monitor may be used for on-line observation of the cable surface cross-section. In addition, the optical detection head does not close around the cable, but is slotted to facilitate installation and alignment on an operating extruder line.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 January 1985
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 0518, Optical Systems Engineering IV, (29 January 1985); doi: 10.1117/12.945188
Show Author Affiliations
LeRoy G. Puffer, United Technologies Research Center (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0518:
Optical Systems Engineering IV
Paul R. Yoder, Editor(s)

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