Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Thermoelectromagnetic Pumps For Space Nuclear Power Systems
Author(s): Robert J. Campana; T. Ciarlariello
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

A ThermoElectroMagnetic Pump (TEMP) is the integration of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) and an electromagnetic pump (EMP) into a single component. TEMPs are ideally suited for space nuclear power systems (SNPSs) currently being developed to provide sustained power sources for the Stategic Defense Initiative (SDI). They are unique safety devices used in the removal of decay heat after reactor shutdown because the decay heat itself is used as the source of energy for pumping power to circulate the coolant. TEMPs may also be used as pumps in the main coolant loops. This paper is a status report on an on-going systematic study of TEMPs for the sustained SDI NSPSs and technolgies being developed, namely thermoelectric, thermionic, and Stirling cycle conversion. TEMPs for power systems ranging from 100ekW to 10eMW are being considered with temperatures ranging up to 1500 K. Permanent magnet, electromagnet, and coreless magnet TEMPs are included. Current and advanced thermoelectric, permanent magnet, electromagnet, and high temperature electrical conductors materials are being evaluated and selected for TEMP designs. The characteristic of TEMP specific mass, i.e., their mass as a function of their hydraulic power output, is the prime criterion of performance. Configuration changes required as a function of pump power and the identity of critical development issues to be resolved in Phase II will be presented in a future report.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 April 1988
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 0871, Space Structures, Power, and Power Conditioning, (6 April 1988); doi: 10.1117/12.943632
Show Author Affiliations
Robert J. Campana, Mine Safety Appliances Company (United States)
T. Ciarlariello, Mine Safety Appliances Company (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0871:
Space Structures, Power, and Power Conditioning
Raymond F. Askew, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top