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Proceedings Paper

Satellite Derived Snow Cover In Climate Diagnostics Studies
Author(s): Chester F. Ropelewski
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Paper Abstract

While we do not have detailed understanding of the interactions and feedbacks between snow cover and the atmosphere, it is clear from even simple energy balance models and preliminary observational studies l that snow area is potentially a very important climatic variable. The areal distribution of snow is central in determining the global albedo as well as prescribing the surface boundary` temperature, moisture, and to some extent, the low level atmospheric static stability. Late season (i.e., spring) snow cover has been related to soil moisture which is in itself an important component of the climate system. While several climatic variables are adequately sampled through a network of surface observation stations, other variables, among them the snow cover, can only be sufficiently monitored by satellite. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been analyzing satellite imagery on a weekly basis for operational estimates of snow cover for over fifteen years. This paper presents a synopses of recent climate research and climate diagnostics studies using these data at the National Weather Service's Climate Analysis Center. Currently available satellite products are evaluated in the light of these studies and a set of desired characteristics for future satellite products are presented.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 August 1984
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 0481, Recent Advances in Civil Space Remote Sensing, (1 August 1984); doi: 10.1117/12.943092
Show Author Affiliations
Chester F. Ropelewski, Climate Analysis Center, National Meteorological Center (United States)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0481:
Recent Advances in Civil Space Remote Sensing

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