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Proceedings Paper

Three-Dimensional Stereographic Pictorial Visual Interfaces And Display Systems In Flight Simulation
Author(s): Alan L. Bridges; John M. Reising
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Paper Abstract

By combining stereoscopic aspects of vision with other optical clues, the pilot of a flight simulator is able to perceive true three-dimensional representations of pictorial display formats or simulated visual scenes. Three-dimensional (3-D) stereographic pictorial formats and their corresponding display systems are being developed and evaluated in order to determine the payoffs of the 3-D computer-generated display formats in the cockpit. The objectives of this research in true three-dimensional cockpit imagery are 1) to determine whether a pilot can better interpret complex pictorial display formats or visual scenes when the third dimension is added and 2) to determine how motion and depth cues can be used to tightly couple the human responses of the pilot to the aircraft control systems. This paper reviews current research, development, and evaluation of easily modifiable 3-D stereo-graphic pictorial display systems being used at the Advanced Cockpit Display Laboratory (ACDL), Lockheed-Georgia Company and at the Flight Dynamics Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB. This research includes the analysis and development of true 3-D pictorial formats representing the entire 3-D flight profile; e.g., displays for terrain following/terrain avoidance/threat avoidance and air-to-air and air-to-surface weapon delivery. Electro-optical shuttering systems; e.g., active and passive liquid crystal shutters (LCSs), stereographic display systems, and high-performance pseudo 3-D computer graphics workstations (Silicon Graphics IRIS), are being used to generate stereo pairs. Sidestick and throttle controllers are used to fly through the visual database. These near real-time simulations will be performed in realistic fighter and transport cockpit shells, which may evolve into 1995 designs.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 June 1987
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 0761, True Three-Dimensional Imaging Techniques & Display Technologies, (16 June 1987); doi: 10.1117/12.940128
Show Author Affiliations
Alan L. Bridges, Lockheed-Georgia Company (United States)
John M. Reising, Flight Dynamics Laboratory (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0761:
True Three-Dimensional Imaging Techniques & Display Technologies
David F. McAllister; Woodrow E. Robbins, Editor(s)

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