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Proceedings Paper

Low Absorbance Measurements
Author(s): T. D. Harris; A. M. Williams
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Paper Abstract

The application of low absorption measurements to dilute solute determination requires specific instrumental characteristics. The use of laser intracavity absorption and thermal lens calorimetry to measure concentration is shown. The specific operating parameters that determine sensitivity are delineated along with the limits different measurement strategies impose. Finally areas of improvement in components that would result in improve sensitivity, accuracy, and reliability are discussed. During the past decade, a large number of methods have been developed for measuring the light absorbed by transparent materials. These include measurements on gases, liquids, and solids. The activity has been prompted by a variety of applications and a similar variety of disciplines. In Table 1 some representative examples of these methods is shown along with their published detection limits.1 It is clear that extraordinarily small absorbances can be measured. Most of the methods can be conveniently divided into two groups. These groups are those that measure the transmission of the sample and those that measure the light absorbed by the sample. The light absorbed methods are calorimetric in character. The advantages and disadvantages of each method varies depending on the principal application for which they were developed. The most prevalent motivation has been to characterize the bulk optical properties of transparent materials. Two examples are the development of extremely transparent glasses for use as fiber optic materials and the development of substrates for high power laser operation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 October 1983
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 0426, Laser-Based Ultrasensitive Spectroscopy and Detection V, (19 October 1983); doi: 10.1117/12.936246
Show Author Affiliations
T. D. Harris, Bell Laboratories (United States)
A. M. Williams, Bell Laboratories (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0426:
Laser-Based Ultrasensitive Spectroscopy and Detection V
Richard A. Keller, Editor(s)

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