Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Optical Fiber Transmission In A Picture Archiving And Communication System For Medical Applications
Author(s): Gilles Aaron; Rene Bonnard
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

In an hospital, the need for an electronic communication network is increasing along with the digitization of pictures. This local area network is intended to link some picture sources such as digital radiography, computed tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance, ultrasounds etc...with an archiving system. Interactive displays can be used in examination rooms, physicians offices and clinics. In such a system, three major requirements must be considered : bit-rate, cable length, and number of devices. - The bit-rate is very important because a maximum response time of a few seconds must be guaranteed for several mega-bit pictures. - The distance between nodes may be a few kilometers in some large hospitals. - The number of devices connected to the network is never greater than a few tens because picture sources and computers represent important hardware, and simple displays can be concentrated. All these conditions are fulfilled by optical fiber transmissions. Depending on the topology and the access protocol, two solutions are to be considered - Active ring - Active or passive star Finally Thomson-CSF developments of optical transmission devices for large networks of TV distribution bring us a technological support and a mass produc-tion which will cut down hardware costs.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 March 1984
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 0405, Optical Fibers in the Biomedical Field, (26 March 1984); doi: 10.1117/12.935650
Show Author Affiliations
Gilles Aaron, THOMSON-CSF/EDIN (France)
Rene Bonnard, THOMSON-CSF/EDIN (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0405:
Optical Fibers in the Biomedical Field
Didier Boucher, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top