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Proceedings Paper

Current And Future Directions Of Lens Design Software
Author(s): Darryl E. Gustafson
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Paper Abstract

The most effective environment for doing lens design continues to evolve as new computer hardware and software tools become available. Important recent hardware developments include: Low-cost but powerful interactive multi-user 32 bit computers with virtual memory that are totally software-compatible with prior larger and more expensive members of the family. A rapidly growing variety of graphics devices for both hard-copy and screen graphics, including many with color capability. In addition, with optical design software readily accessible in many forms, optical design has become a part-time activity for a large number of engineers instead of being restricted to a small number of full-time specialists. A designer interface that is friendly for the part-time user while remaining efficient for the full-time designer is thus becoming more important as well as more practical. Along with these developments, software tools in other scientific and engineering disciplines are proliferating. Thus, the optical designer is less and less unique in his use of computer-aided techniques and faces the challenge and opportunity of efficiently communicating his designs to other computer-aided-design (CAD), computer-aided-manufacturing (CAM), structural, thermal, and mechanical software tools. This paper will address the impact of these developments on the current and future directions of the CODE VTM optical design software package, its implementation, and the resulting lens design environment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 October 1983
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 0399, Optical System Design, Analysis, and Production, (26 October 1983); doi: 10.1117/12.935428
Show Author Affiliations
Darryl E. Gustafson, Optical Research Associates (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0399:
Optical System Design, Analysis, and Production
Robert E. Fischer; Philip J. Rogers, Editor(s)

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