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Proceedings Paper

Hologram Scanner Design And Fabrication In Dichromated Gelatin (DCG)
Author(s): Richard Rallison; Rick Lowe
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Paper Abstract

Two major applications of holographic scanners are considered, the first is the code reader scanner now in use in supermarkets and soon to be used in automated warehousing. The second is the multipurpose line scanner currently used in line printers and soon to be included in automated inspection systems. Code reader facets perform multiple functions, each one deflects and focuses laser light at a unique angle and scans a short arc, the return light from a bar code is collimated by the same facet and is subsequently focused through a small aperture. Ambient light is diffracted at other angles and focused at points all around the aperture giving a high signal to noise ratio and the large high efficiency facets gather sufficient return light so that photo diodes and low power lasers can be used in the system. Line scanners can be made in a large variety of sizes and configurations inexpensively and with perfect fidelity, each one being a holographic replica of a master hologram. Focused arcs as well as parallel straight lines and even arbitrary computer generated scans are possible. The limitations and considerations of such devices are discussed along with design criteria related to fabrication problems and actual production line results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 July 1983
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 0353, Industrial and Commercial Applications of Holography, (7 July 1983); doi: 10.1117/12.933949
Show Author Affiliations
Richard Rallison, International Dichromate Corporation (United States)
Rick Lowe, International Dichromate Corporation (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0353:
Industrial and Commercial Applications of Holography
Milton Chang, Editor(s)

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