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Proceedings Paper

United States Air Force Tactical Reconnaissance�An Analysis And Commentary
Author(s): Richard E. Reamer
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Paper Abstract

There is still a desperate need for reconnaissance support to the tactical air and ground commander, despite increased skepticism as to the responsiveness of tactical reconnaissance. In order for tactical reconnaissance to survive, however, it must be responsive to the modern fluid and dynamic battle situation of today. There are three roles for tactical reconnaissance - tactical surveillance, conventional reconnaissance and integrated strike reconnaissance. All three of these roles are vital to the successful use of limited battlefield resources. The generation of hundreds of thousands of feet of celluloid will win neither battles nor friends for reconnaissance. The integration of all recce information and its timely dissemination to the primary user of that information is a core element in the entire tactical reconnaissance picture. Without the rapid communication of meaningful information to the tactical commander, tactical reconnaissance is meaningless. Tactical reconnaissance can generate a dynamic change in the application of and ability to fight with the forces at our disposal. It can provide invaluable time for preparation, information for the allocation of reserves, real time strike allocation and utilization and real time anti-air threat data. Tactical reconnaissance has the potential and the equipment to be a force multiplier.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 December 1981
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 0309, Airborne Reconnaissance V, (12 December 1981); doi: 10.1117/12.932750
Show Author Affiliations
Richard E. Reamer, HQ TAC/DORR (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0309:
Airborne Reconnaissance V
Robert J. Bannach, Editor(s)

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