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Proceedings Paper

Infrared Techniques Applied To Large Solar Arrays
Author(s): R. Paulson; H. Decker; J. Hodor; J. Barney
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Paper Abstract

As solar arrays for space applications become larger and larger, the circuits and solar cells become thinner and more delicate. Now, with the advent of folding and unfolding reusable arrays, the integrity of the array becomes more critical. A number of infrared techniques have been developed to assist in this area. First, an 8 - 13 μm infrared scanner proved to be an excellent way of identifying nonfunctioning or defective cells. The same scanner with optical modifications could also detect defective cell bonds. Next, a near infrared device has been adapted to both sense and control cell-to-circuit bonding in real-time as well as provide product assurance documentation on each bond. A fourth application utilizes a videoized infrared microscope which looks through the silicon showing normally invisible cracks in the silicon as well as bond footprints. The combined infrared techniques make it possible to not only assure a high integrity durable array to start with, but provide the means of nondestructively checking arrays and also detecting and identifying the bad cells or bonds for refurbishing used arrays.

Paper Details

Date Published: 31 March 1982
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 0304, Modern Utilization of Infrared Technology VII, (31 March 1982); doi: 10.1117/12.932684
Show Author Affiliations
R. Paulson, Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (United States)
H. Decker, Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (United States)
J. Hodor, Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (United States)
J. Barney, Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 0304:
Modern Utilization of Infrared Technology VII
Irving J. Spiro, Editor(s)

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