Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Multiband OFDM-UWB signals over hybrid fiber-wireless Link
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

The Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing Ultra-Wideband (OFDM-UWB) technique that widely used for the new emerging networks requires further investigation in terms of fiber length and UWB signal degradation. Simulations are used in this work to estimate the system performance which consists of two main links: wireless and optical, where the channel is considered as point to point between the UWB transmitter and the UWB receiver. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of UWB signals of carrying data to the end users within a campus area through an optical fiber link. A cost effective optical components are used in the system. The UWB signals are transmitted over a channel bandwidth of 528 MHz via low bit rate OFDM-subcarriers. Then, the accumulated data from each OFDM subcarrier is transmitted over an optical channel. Finally, UWB signals are wirelessly distributed to the end user over a short distance depending on the data rate being used. For this point to point system, using simulations, the performance of the system in terms of the bit error rate (BER) is examined. The results show that the wireless channel effects have the larger impact on the overall system performance compared with the fiber length effect.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 October 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8498, Optics and Photonics for Information Processing VI, 849803 (15 October 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.931756
Show Author Affiliations
S. Kenshil, Univ. of Denver (United States)
G. Rashwan, Univ. of Denver (United States)
M. Matin, Univ. of Denver (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8498:
Optics and Photonics for Information Processing VI
Abdul A. S. Awwal; Khan M. Iftekharuddin, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top