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Proceedings Paper

Beam and target alignment at the National Ignition Facility using the Target Alignment Sensor (TAS)
Author(s): P. Di Nicola; D. Kalantar; T. McCarville; J. Klingmann; S. Alvarez; R. Lowe-Webb; J. Lawson; P. Datte; P. Danforth; M. Schneider; J.-M. Di Nicola; J. Jackson; C. Orth; S. Azevedo; R. Tommasini; A. Manuel; R. Wallace
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Paper Abstract

The requirements for beam and target alignment for successful ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are stringent: the average of beams to the target must be within 25 μm. Beam and target alignment are achieved with the Target Alignment Sensor (TAS). The TAS is a precision optical device that is inserted into target chamber center to facilitate both beam and target alignment. It incorporates two camera views (upper/lower and side) mounted on each of two stage assemblies (jaws) to view and align the target. It also incorporates a large mirror on each of the two assemblies to reflect the alignment beams onto the upper/lower cameras for beam alignment. The TAS is located in the chamber using reference features by viewing it with two external telescope views. The two jaws are adjusted in elevation to match the desired beam and target alignment locations. For some shot setups, a sequence of TAS positions is required to achieve the full setup and alignment. In this paper we describe the TAS, the characterization of the TAS coordinates for beam and target alignment, and summarize pointing shots that demonstrate the accuracy of beam-target alignment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 October 2012
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 8505, Target Diagnostics Physics and Engineering for Inertial Confinement Fusion, 85050B (15 October 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.930173
Show Author Affiliations
P. Di Nicola, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
D. Kalantar, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
T. McCarville, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
J. Klingmann, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
S. Alvarez, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
R. Lowe-Webb, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
J. Lawson, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
P. Datte, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
P. Danforth, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
M. Schneider, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
J.-M. Di Nicola, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
J. Jackson, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
C. Orth, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
S. Azevedo, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
R. Tommasini, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
A. Manuel, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
R. Wallace, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8505:
Target Diagnostics Physics and Engineering for Inertial Confinement Fusion
Perry Bell; Gary P. Grim, Editor(s)

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