Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Design and assembly of a telecentric zoom lens for the Cygnus x-ray source
Author(s): Robert M. Malone; Stuart A. Baker; Kristina K. Brown; Alden H. Curtis; David L. Esquibel; Daniel K. Frayer; Brent C. Frogget; Michael R. Furlanetto; James R. Garten; Todd J. Haines; Russell A. Howe; Joe A. Huerta; Morris I. Kaufman; Nickolas S. P. King; Stephen S. Lutz; Kevin D. McGillivray; Andrew S. Smith
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Cygnus is a high-energy radiographic x-ray source. The rod-pinch x-ray diode produces a point source measuring 1 mm diameter. The target object is placed 1.5 m from the x-ray source, with a large LYSO scintillator at 2.4 m. Differentsized objects are imploded within a containment vessel. A large pellicle deflects the scintillator light out of the x-ray path into an 11-element zoom lens coupled to a CCD camera. The zoom lens and CCD must be as close as possible to the scintillator to maximize light collection. A telecentric lens design minimizes image blur from a volume source. To maximize the resolution of test objects of different sizes, the scintillator and zoom lens can be translated along the x-ray axis. Zoom lens magnifications are changed when different-sized scintillators and recording cameras are used (50 or 62 mm square format). The LYSO scintillator measures 200 × 200 mm and is 5 mm thick. The scintillator produces blue light peaking at 435 nm, so special lens materials are required. By swapping out one lens element and allowing all lenses to move, the zoom lens can also use a CsI(Tl) scintillator that produces green light centered at 550 nm. All lenses are coated with anti-reflective coating for both wavelength bands. Two sets of doublets, the stop, and the CCD camera move during zoom operations. One doublet has XY compensation. The first three lenses use fused silica for radiation damage control. The 60 lb of glass inside the 340 lb mechanical structure is oriented vertically.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 October 2012
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 8488, Zoom Lenses IV, 84880B (24 October 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.929160
Show Author Affiliations
Robert M. Malone, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Stuart A. Baker, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Kristina K. Brown, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Alden H. Curtis, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
David L. Esquibel, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Daniel K. Frayer, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Brent C. Frogget, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Michael R. Furlanetto, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
James R. Garten, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Todd J. Haines, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Russell A. Howe, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Joe A. Huerta, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Morris I. Kaufman, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Nickolas S. P. King, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Stephen S. Lutz, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Kevin D. McGillivray, National Security Technologies. LLC (United States)
Andrew S. Smith, National Security Technologies. LLC (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8488:
Zoom Lenses IV
Ellis I. Betensky; Takanori Yamanashi, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top