Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

TIGER: a high contrast infrared imager for the Giant Magellan Telescope
Author(s): Philip Hinz; Johanan Codona; Olivier Guyon; William Hoffmann; Andrew Skemer; Joseph Hora; Volker Tolls; Alan Boss; Alycia Weinberger; Paul Arbo; Thomas Connors; Olivier Durney; Thomas McMahon; Manny Montoya; Vidhya Vaitheeswaran
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

The Thermal Infrared imager for the GMT which provides Extreme contrast and Resolution (TIGER) is intended as a small-scale, targeted instrument capable of detecting and characterizing exoplanets and circumstellar disks, around both young systems in formation, and more mature systems in the solar neighborhood. TIGER can also provide general purpose infrared imaging at wavelengths from 1.5-14 μm. The instrument will utilize the facility adaptive optics (AO) system. With its operation at NIR to MIR wavelengths (where good image quality is easier to achieve), and much of the high-impact science using modestly bright guide stars, the instrument can be used early in the operation of the GMT. The TIGER concept is a dual channel imager and low resolution spectrometer, with high contrast modes of observations to fulfill the above science goals. A long wavelength channel (LWC) will cover 7-14 μm wavelength, while a short wavelength channel (SWC) will cover the 1.5-5 μm wavelength region. Both channels will have a 30° FOV. In addition to imaging, low-resolution spectroscopy (R=300) is possible with TIGER for both the SWC and LWC, using insertable grisms.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 September 2012
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 8446, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV, 84461P (24 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.926751
Show Author Affiliations
Philip Hinz, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Johanan Codona, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Olivier Guyon, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
William Hoffmann, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Andrew Skemer, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Joseph Hora, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Volker Tolls, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Alan Boss, Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
Alycia Weinberger, Carnegie Institution of Washington (United States)
Paul Arbo, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Thomas Connors, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Olivier Durney, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Thomas McMahon, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Manny Montoya, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Vidhya Vaitheeswaran, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8446:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV
Ian S. McLean; Suzanne K. Ramsay; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top