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Proceedings Paper

Summary of observations of the infrared camera (IRC) onboard AKARI
Author(s): T. Onaka; H. Matsuhara; T. Wada; D. Ishihara; Y. Ohyama; I. Sakon; T. Shimonishi; R. Ohsawa; T. I. Mori; F. Egusa; F. Usui; S. Takita; H. Murakami; S. Oyabu; M. Yamagishi; T. Mori; A. Mouri; T. Kondo; S. Suzuki; H. Kaneda; Y. Ita; T. Ootsubo
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Paper Abstract

AKARI, the Japanese satellite mission dedicated to infrared astronomy was launched in 2006 February and exhausted its liquid helium in 2007 August. During the cold mission phase, the Infrared Camera (IRC) onboard carried out an all-sky survey at 9 and 18µm with better spatial resolution and higher sensitivity than IRAS. Both bands also have slightly shorter wavelength coverage than IRAS 12 and 25μm bands and thus provide different information on the infrared sky. All-sky image data of the IRC are now in the final processing and will be released to the public within a year. After the exhaustion of the cryogen, the telescope and focal plane instruments of AKARI had still been kept at sufficiently low temperatures owing to the onboard cryocooler. Near-infrared (NIR) imaging and spectroscopic observations with the IRC had continued until 2011 May, when the spacecraft had a serious problem in the power supply system that forced us to terminate the observation. The IRC carried out nearly 20000 pointing observations in total despite of its near-earth orbit. About a half of them were performed after the exhaustion of the cryogen in the spectroscopic modes, which provided high-sensitivity NIR spectra from 2 to 5µm without disturbance of the terrestrial atmosphere. During the warm mission phase, the temperature of the instrument gradually increased and changed the array operation conditions. We present a summary of AKARI/IRC observations, including the all-sky mid-infrared diffuse data as well as the data taken in the warm mission phase.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 September 2012
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 8442, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 844213 (27 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.926717
Show Author Affiliations
T. Onaka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
H. Matsuhara, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
T. Wada, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
D. Ishihara, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
Y. Ohyama, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Taiwan)
I. Sakon, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
T. Shimonishi, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Kobe Univ. (Japan)
R. Ohsawa, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
T. I. Mori, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
F. Egusa, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
F. Usui, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
S. Takita, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
H. Murakami, Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
S. Oyabu, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
M. Yamagishi, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
T. Mori, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
A. Mouri, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
T. Kondo, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
S. Suzuki, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
H. Kaneda, Nagoya Univ. (Japan)
Y. Ita, Astronomical Institute, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)
T. Ootsubo, Astronomical Institute, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8442:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave
Mark C. Clampin; Giovanni G. Fazio; Howard A. MacEwen; Jacobus M. Oschmann, Editor(s)

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