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Proceedings Paper

Euclid: ESA's mission to map the geometry of the dark universe
Author(s): R. Laureijs; P. Gondoin; L. Duvet; G. Saavedra Criado; J. Hoar; J. Amiaux; J.-L. Auguères; R. Cole; M. Cropper; A. Ealet; P. Ferruit; I. Escudero Sanz; K. Jahnke; R. Kohley; T. Maciaszek; Y. Mellier; T. Oosterbroek; F. Pasian; M. Sauvage; R. Scaramella; M. Sirianni; L. Valenziano
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Paper Abstract

Euclid is a space-borne survey mission developed and operated by ESA. It is designed to understand the origin of the Universe's accelerating expansion. Euclid will use cosmological probes to investigate the nature of dark energy, dark matter and gravity by tracking their observational signatures on the geometry of the Universe and on the history of structure formation. The mission is optimised for the measurement of two independent cosmological probes: weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering. The payload consists of a 1.2 m Korsch telescope designed to provide a large field of view. The light is directed to two instruments provided by the Euclid Consortium: a visual imager (VIS) and a near-infrared spectrometer-photometer (NISP). Both instruments cover a large common field of view of 0.54 deg2, to be able to survey at least 15,000 deg2 for a nominal mission of 6 years. An overview of the mission will be presented: the scientific objectives, payload, satellite, and science operations. We report on the status of the Euclid mission with a foreseen launch in 2019.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 September 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8442, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 84420T (21 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.926496
Show Author Affiliations
R. Laureijs, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
P. Gondoin, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
L. Duvet, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
G. Saavedra Criado, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
J. Hoar, European Space Astronomy Ctr. (Spain)
J. Amiaux, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique (France)
J.-L. Auguères, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique (France)
R. Cole, Mullard Space Science Lab., Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
M. Cropper, Mullard Space Science Lab., Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
A. Ealet, Ctr. de Physique des Particules de Marseille (France)
P. Ferruit, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
I. Escudero Sanz, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
K. Jahnke, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Germany)
R. Kohley, European Space Astronomy Ctr. (Spain)
T. Maciaszek, Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille Provence (France)
Y. Mellier, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris (France)
T. Oosterbroek, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
F. Pasian, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Italy)
M. Sauvage, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique (France)
R. Scaramella, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy)
M. Sirianni, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
L. Valenziano, INAF - IASF Bologna (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8442:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave
Mark C. Clampin; Giovanni G. Fazio; Howard A. MacEwen; Jacobus M. Oschmann Jr., Editor(s)

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