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Proceedings Paper

BATMAN: a DMD-based MOS demonstrator on Galileo Telescope
Author(s): Frédéric Zamkotsian; Paolo Spanò; William Bon; Marco Riva; Patrick Lanzoni; Luciano Nicastro; Emilio Molinari; Rosario Cosentino; Adriano Ghedina; Manuel Gonzalez; Paolo Di Marcantonio; Igor Coretti; Roberto Cirami; Marco Manetta; Filippo Zerbi; Daniela Tresoldi; Luca Valenziano
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Paper Abstract

Multi-Object Spectrographs (MOS) are the major instruments for studying primary galaxies and remote and faint objects. Current object selection systems are limited and/or difficult to implement in next generation MOS for space and groundbased telescopes. A promising solution is the use of MOEMS devices such as micromirror arrays which allow the remote control of the multi-slit configuration in real time. We are developing a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) - based spectrograph demonstrator called BATMAN. We want to access the largest FOV with the highest contrast. The selected component is a DMD chip from Texas Instruments in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. Our optical design is an all-reflective spectrograph design with F/4 on the DMD component. This demonstrator permits the study of key parameters such as throughput, contrast and ability to remove unwanted sources in the FOV (background, spoiler sources), PSF effect, new observational modes. This study will be conducted in the visible with possible extension in the IR. A breadboard on an optical bench, ROBIN, has been developed for a preliminary determination of these parameters. The demonstrator on the sky is then of prime importance for characterizing the actual performance of this new family of instruments, as well as investigating the operational procedures on astronomical objects. BATMAN will be placed on the Nasmyth focus of Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) during next year.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 September 2012
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 8446, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV, 84464U (24 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.926330
Show Author Affiliations
Frédéric Zamkotsian, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ. (France)
Paolo Spanò, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
William Bon, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ. (France)
Marco Riva, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Patrick Lanzoni, Lab. d'Astrophysique de Marseille, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ. (France)
Luciano Nicastro, INAF - IASF Bologna (Italy)
Emilio Molinari, INAF - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (Italy)
Rosario Cosentino, INAF - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (Italy)
Adriano Ghedina, INAF - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (Italy)
Manuel Gonzalez, INAF - Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (Italy)
Paolo Di Marcantonio, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Italy)
Igor Coretti, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Italy)
Roberto Cirami, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Italy)
Marco Manetta, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste (Italy)
Filippo Zerbi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Daniela Tresoldi, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Luca Valenziano, INAF - IASF Bologna (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8446:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV
Ian S. McLean; Suzanne K. Ramsay; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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